Its sharing capabilities don’t lack, either. You can share content with specific individuals via email or by generating a link and copying and pasting it. You can share a folder by generating a link or inviting users via email. If you use an email to share a folder, the recipients will need to register for a Tresorit account. Files can only be shared with a link and don’t have that requirement.
The availability, durability, and cost benefits of cloud storage can be very compelling to business owners, but traditional IT functional owners like storage, backup, networking, security, and compliance administrators may have concerns around the realities of transferring large amounts of data to the cloud. Cloud data migration services services such as AWS Import/Export Snowball can simplify migrating storage into the cloud by addressing high network costs, long transfer times, and security concerns.
MediaFire is a lesser-known file sharing/storage service, but with a free plan offering 10GB of storage, it’s worth considering. The free service lets you upload files up to 4GB in size, and uploads are scanned with the BitDefender antivirus engine. You can share file links on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest, Tumblr, and Blogger and generate a one-time download link. MediaFire is easy to use, too, with an intuitive interface.
Since the advent of the internet, the technology industry has been steadily moving away from local storage to remote, server-based storage and processing—what is known as the cloud. Look at music and movies: We used to play them from local media, but now they're streamed from servers. By keeping your own documents and media files in the cloud, you can reap the same advantages of anywhere-access and sharing. Productivity gains and reduced local storage requirements are additional benefits. We've rounded up the best cloud storage and file-sharing and file-syncing services to help you decide which are right for you.
Oh hello, Amazon. As we’ve said, it’s still cheap, just not quite as cheap. You’ve got some key factors to consider outside of just price, though. First, are you an Amazon Prime member? If so, you’ve got unlimited photo storage at your disposal, so do that. Yes, even if you’re already storing them in Google Photos or iCloud or wherever. The more important question, though, might be how prepared you are to live with Amazon’s stripped down cloud interface. It’s fine, just basic, which for novice users may be handy but could frustrate people who like to fiddle.
Mobile compatibility has gained a place in the ecosystem of business. This especially applies to road warriors who frequently work in planes, cars, and subways. Space is often at a premium, and the ability to prepare for a meeting or analyze a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet on the go is a necessity. Having a cloud storage solution that can provide these capabilities to users via a software client optimized for their particular operating system (OS), be it Android, iOS, even Windows Phone, is a feature you should look for in a competitive service offering. For example, Dropbox Business recently added some new mobile features on iOS that let users see file activity and team feedback in file preview.
Apple iCloud allows you to make folders for your files and provides online storage for Apple’s productivity apps such as Keynote, Numbers, and Pages. Setup is easy on all devices including PC, Mac, iPod touch, iPhone, and iPad. If you have bought a new Apple device, you can use the setup assistant for guidance. And for other devices, getting started only needs a few quick steps.

Google’s G Suite could work, which starts at $5 per user for a shared pool of 30GB of cloud storage, or $10 per user for unlimited storage (if you have more than five users; 1TB per user if you have fewer than five). If you want others to be able to upload and download files seamlessly in your cloud, you’ll need to create accounts for them—otherwise, they’ll just be able to download files. This could get costly, and not really solve the spending issue you identified in your letter.
ShareFile, which Citrix acquired in 2011, creates a custom file-sharing site for your business, so you can share files easily with clients, partners, co-workers and others. The service offers numerous compelling features and tools for business users, including workflow management, document collaboration, e-signatures and integration with Microsoft Outlook and Gmail. Security is robust, too, with up to 256-bit AES encryption and customizable permissions settings.
Quick take: This service lets you upload as many photos (though just photos) as you want. However, Sony downsizes the images to about 3-megapixels, which roughly translates to a 6x5-inch print at 300 dpi. There’s no paid storage option. It may not be an ideal solution, but because it’s free, the service can serve as a smart secondary or tertiary backup plan because it allows for automatic photo uploads through your smartphone.

Why have we included Egnyte in our list of top file sharing websites? What we really like about this app, and we believe you will like too, is that the system allows you to create and personalize files. Using it, you can rely on the fact you’re working in a 100% protected system which responds to the highest encryption standards, and backs up both your synced originals and the copies you’ve shared with your contacts. Pricing is once again flexible to suit the needs of users with different financial capabilities.


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Storing your most sensitive files locally on a hard drive is still (and probably always will be) the logical thing to do. But it’s not always the most convenient, which is why most of us look to cloud storage as a secondary option. It has its own set of benefits: it’s reasonably affordable, it makes sharing files easier, it’s ubiquitous across most operating systems and devices, and it’s just really nice to have a backup when your hard drive dies.

Storing your files in the cloud has many advantages. You can view your files from any phone, tablet or computer that's connected to the Internet, and the cloud can also provide backup for files so they'll never disappear if your phone gets lost or your computer crashes. Using the cloud is a no-brainer, but picking which service to use is a bit more difficult.
Many cloud storage services have a free account that usually comes with some limitations, such as the amount of storage they provide or a size limit on files you can upload. We prefer services that offer some level of free service (even if it's only 2GB) rather than a time-based trial, because that lets you fully integrate a service into your life for several weeks while you get a feel for how it works and what might go wrong with your particular setup.
It’s not quite as platform-limited as iCloud, but OneDrive will definitely appeal most to dedicated Windows users. And if you are one, it’s a good deal! Not only is the pricing competitive, but Microsoft also throws in an Office 365 subscription. (And vice versa; if you subscribe to Office 365, you also get OneDrive storage. The power of bundles!) The service itself, from interface to features, doesn’t blow the doors off otherwise, but if you’re firmly entrenched in Windowsworld you could surely do worse.
Google Drive is one of the most respected and popular cloud storage apps available. Users get 15GB free out of the gate with unlimited photo and video backup via Google Photos if they so choose (with the proper quality settings). There is also an assortment of office apps available for documents, note taking, spreadsheets, and presentations. You can upgrade to 100GB ($1.99/month) or 1TB ($9.99) for fairly cheap and there is an option for 10TB as well ($99.99 per month). The office apps and cloud storage combo is a potent one and one that competitors have a hard time beating.

First up is OneDrive, Microsoft's storage option. Those who use Windows 8 and 10 have OneDrive built into their operating system, where it shows up in the file explorer next to all of the files on your computer's hard drive. However, anyone can use it on the Web, by downloading a desktop app for Mac and earlier versions of Windows, or the OneDrive Android, iOS, Windows Phone and Xbox apps.
Family Sharing requires a personal Apple ID signed in to iCloud and iTunes. Music, movies, TV shows, and books can be downloaded on up to 10 devices per account, five of which can be computers. iOS 8 or later and OS X Yosemite or later are required to set up or join a Family Sharing group and are recommended for full functionality. Not all content is eligible for Family Sharing. Content can be hidden by family members; hidden content is not available for download. Content downloaded from family members or acquired via redemption codes is not subject to Ask to Buy.
With Family Sharing, you can start sharing your location with the rest of the family automatically. If you’re running late to a restaurant or need to know if your kid made it to band practice, just use Find My Friends or the Messages app to keep tabs on each other. If you need privacy, you can temporarily stop sharing your location by turning off Share My Location in iCloud settings.
Barracuda is an online backup solution that allows you to customize your backup system how want, with either cloud storage, local premise or a combination of each. It also features cloud-to-cloud backup with Office 365 cloud storage for extra security. Barracuda offers you multiple layers of protection with multiple points of backup and emergency recovery options.
The range of capabilities of cloud-based storage services is incredible. Many of them specialize in a specific area. For example, Dropbox and SugarSync focus on keeping a synced folder accessible everywhere. SpiderOak emphasizes security. Some cloud storage services, such as Apple iCloud, Google Drive and Microsoft OneDrive, are generalists, offering not only folder and file syncing, but also media-playing and device syncing. These products even double as collaboration software, offering real-time document coediting.
Because all of the company’s services are integrated with Drive, they dip from the same 15GB pot you get with the free account. For us, that’s not enough; one of our testers had amassed almost 10GB just in archived emails in his personal account over the past five years, which would leave him with only 5GB of space for everything else. If he were a photo-fanatic, that wouldn’t be a whole lot of space.
File sharing and syncing features are the foundation of a cloud storage service. You’ll more than likely going to use them first because syncing will get your files to the cloud while sharing files will help you, well, share them with others. Most of the services use the common model of sync developed by Dropbox in 2007. Read more about it in our Dropbox review.
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