There is also a feature that allows you to remotely access files on another PC via the OneDrive website. If privacy is a major concern then it should be noted that Microsoft reserve the right to scan your files to look for what it would deem objectionable content. This could be copyrighted material or things of an explicit nature. Apple has a similar policy, making the two potentially more intrusive than their competitors.
Google Drive offers plenty of plans to choose from. The free one gives you a whopping 15GB of storage and makes it fit for our list of the best free cloud storage offers. The paid plans start at 100GB and end at 30TB, but most aren’t good value. The 1TB plan costs $9.99 per month, which is the best one among them, but it’s still not close to, say, pCloud.
Quick take: That 10GB of free storage is generous compared with the plans of other services on this list. Box also offers a Personal Pro plan with 100GB of storage for $10 per month. Box lacks features such as tagging powered by artificial intelligence and photo-editing software, however. And you have to pay the monthly fee to unlock the automatic uploading feature.
Comedian George Carlin has a routine in which he talks about how humans seem to spend their lives accumulating "stuff." Once they've gathered enough stuff, they have to find places to store all of it. If Carlin were to update that routine today, he could make the same observation about computer information. It seems that everyone with a computer spends a lot of time acquiring data and then trying to find a way to store it.
By creating an account on Dropbox, you’ll earn 2GB of cloud storage, the lowest amount given by a major service. While the free tier, called “basic,” is just that in most regards, it allows you to collaborate in real time with others in Dropbox Paper, its word processor tool. It’s currently limited to text documents, though users in any tier can open and edit stored documents through Microsoft Office online tools like Word and Excel for free.
Yes, there are a lot of things that could go wrong (take the Yahoo and Equifax data breaches, for example), but that doesn’t mean you have to live in fear of the cloud — just be smart with your data. Our top recommendations offer cutting-edge protection: two-factor authentication, facilities that are protected with 24-hour monitoring, and data that’s encrypted in “transit” (SSL and TLS) and “at rest” (128-bit AES and on).
Dropbox is easy to use, so if you’re new to online file storage, this is a great place to start. The file management is intuitive, and all the apps (including the browser client) are built around a minimalistic theme that offers the same fluid experience on all major operating systems and devices — which is something we can’t say about all of its competitors. Whether you’re on an iPhone or a Galaxy, the operating system integration is tight, and you’ll feel right at home.
Microsoft OneDrive is a popular cloud storage option because it integrates directly with a variety of Windows products. For starters, can get 5GB of free cloud storage and you can upgrade to 50GB for $1.99 per month. OneDrive storage is also included in every Office 365 subscription, be it for personal use or for businesses. You can get a bundled package of OneDrive space and Microsoft Office 365 for $6.99 per month (1TB, one device) or $9.99 per month (5TB, five devices). That gives you Microsoft Office and online cloud storage space for an exceptionally reasonable price.
Dropbox is the granddaddy of cloud file storage apps, available for Windows, Linux, and Mac desktop computers, as well as iPhone and Android phones. The idea behind Dropbox is a simple one: After you install the application, a Dropbox folder appears on your desktop, and you can drag and drop and organize your files in that one folder, which is stored in the cloud. This means you can work with that folder on multiple computers or on your mobile device and your synchronized files are always just a click or tap away. Dropbox gives you 2GB of storage space when you sign up for a free account. If you want to increase the amount of space available for your files, you can upgrade to a Pro 50 account and get 50GB for $9.99 per month or get 100GB for a monthly fee of $19.99.
However, if you’re dissatisfied and ready for change, Dropbox is my top choice. I’ve been a user since 2008 and never had an issue. The service is supported by a large ecosystem of apps, it’s easy to use and share files with others, and it continues to evolve in positive ways. That said, Box, Google Drive and Microsoft OneDrive are all good choices, too.
After evaluating more than 45 different options, interviewing power users across the nation, and testing the top apps, we are confident that our picks are the best, most reliable cloud storage providers on the market today. All four will provide you with roughly the same lineup of features, and each has a version that'll let you take advantage of the cloud without paying a dime. The right cloud storage option will offer the space you need on the operating system you love at a price you’re ready to pay.
A Shared Album can hold up to 5000 photos and videos. If you reach your Shared Album limit, you need to delete some photos or videos before adding new ones. The photos and videos you share (and the comments or likes associated with those photos) stay in iCloud until you or the contributor delete them manually, or until you delete the Shared Album completely.

Signing up for an individual account at Box gives you 10GB of cloud storage, which is a good start. Similar to Dropbox, Box natively allows its users to create text documents that can be edited in real time with collaborators. This cloud storage service also offers the ability to edit text as well as other types of documents with Microsoft’s Office tools integration, which are like Google’s suite of productivity apps, but more akin to the legacy desktop apps that some are accustomed to using.
Locking data away doesn't end with just passwords, either. In addition to having something you know, it's better to pair it with something you have. Two-factor or even multifactor authentication (MFA) is becoming a more commonplace option, and cloud storage companies are getting onboard. Mobile phones, or specially prepared USB fobs, are typically the default option as the secondary authentication source. But other forms of tokens exist, including smart cards and biometrics.
A form of cloud storage where the enterprise and cloud storage provider are integrated in the enterprise's data center. In private cloud storage, the storage provider has infrastructure in the enterprise's data center that is typically managed by the storage provider. Private cloud storage helps resolve the potential for security and performance concerns while still offering the advantages of cloud storage.
Also known as mobile cloud storage, personal cloud storage is a subset of public cloud storage that applies to storing an individual's data in the cloud and providing the individual with access to the data from anywhere. It also provides data syncing and sharing capabilities across multiple devices. Apple's iCloud is an example of personal cloud storage.

Like Dropbox, Google Drive automatically syncs with the cloud so that everything is consistent across all of your devices. Also, like Dropbox, it integrates with Windows and Mac file systems. I'm sorry — and annoyed — to report that, despite many promises, Google Drive still doesn't natively support Linux. Come on, Google, get off the stick! Google Drive does, however, support Google's own Chrome OS, Android, and Apple's iOS.


A client syncs (sends) copies of files over the Internet to the data server, which then saves the information. When the client wishes to retrieve the information, he or she accesses the data server through a web, desktop or mobile client. The server then either sends the files back to the client or allows the client to access and manipulate the files on the server itself.
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