Microsoft SkyDrive is a free cloud service that offers users 25GB of storage. SkyDrive is great for users because all they need to do is log in with their Windows Live accounts, and from there they can invite anyone they want to share data. This approach makes it hard for IT to control SkyDrive. If IT pros want a more secure Microsoft offering that still gets the file-sharing job done, they should consider SharePoint. With SharePoint, users still have an easy way to share documents with others, and IT benefits from better corporate integration.
Amazon Cloud Drive offers 5 GB of storage for free (and more for an annual fee). This personal cloud storage service is geared towards end users who buy music from the Amazon MP3 service, but it’s open to other types of data as well. There is no way for IT to securely integrate Amazon Cloud Drive into a corporate environment, so the safest bet is to block this service.

Previously known as SkyDrive, OneDrive is Microsoft’s own combo of a cloud storage solution and an Office suite. If you’re primarily a Windows or Microsoft Office user, taking advantage of this cloud is almost effortless. OneDrive is deeply integrated with Windows 10 and Windows Phone and best serves those already invested in the ecosystem. However, outside the Windows system, it’s a bit more difficult to navigate. We also had to go through the verification process several times before it stuck on all the devices that we used throughout the week.
IT can’t ignore Apple iCloud. This personal cloud storage service, which debuted in iOS 5 and will also have an expanded presence in Mac OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion, backs up media and documents that users download and create, which is great for personal use. Despite some enterprise IT fears about iCloud, there might be a silver lining: iTunes is the portal through which files get to iCloud, and since iTunes has to run on a computer, a system administrator can use system policies to restrict users’ access.
4. Evernote: saves all of your notes, web clips, files, scanned documents, and images. You can search for the documents by keyword, access them from any device, and share them with friends. The storage process here is a little different: free users can store up to 100,000 notes (up to 25 mb each), 250 synchronized notebooks, 10,000 tags, and 100 saved searches.
4. Evernote: saves all of your notes, web clips, files, scanned documents, and images. You can search for the documents by keyword, access them from any device, and share them with friends. The storage process here is a little different: free users can store up to 100,000 notes (up to 25 mb each), 250 synchronized notebooks, 10,000 tags, and 100 saved searches.
In late 2015, Microsoft made an announcement that it would no longer offer unlimited cloud storage to Office 365 subscribers. Instead, they are limited to 1TB. Additionally, beginning in early 2016, the 100GB and 200GB paid storage plans will be discontinued, replaced with a 50GB for $1.99 per month plan. You will no longer get extra space if you allow the OneDrive apps to automatically backup photos on your phone. Finally, anyone with a Microsoft account will only get 5GB of free storage, instead of 15GB. We will update this guide in 2016 when those changes are made.
You probably didn't realise it, but a big part of Amazon's business is cloud storage. So Amazon Drive isn't merely a 'me too' service. Drive used to be much more basic than its counterparts and was only for backing up your photos and videos. But now that has changed and - if you're an Amazon Prime member - you get unlimited storage for photos and 5GB for videos, music and other files.

“Being a small business owner, I run into the issue all the time of clients and their cloud storage systems. Google Drive, Dropbox, Box, etc. It creates quite the headache to be able to find everything, and it also becomes pretty expensive to maintain a subscription to all of these different platforms. How would you suggest consolidating everything into one main platform, while still making it convenient for my clients?”

You can access your cloud files through an app or software installed on your computer (once it's installed, it's usually pretty much invisible), though you need an internet connection for it to work. If you temporarily don't have an internet connection, that's okay. The service waits until the next time you do have a connection and takes care of business then.

Signing up for an individual account at Box gives you 10GB of cloud storage, which is a good start. Similar to Dropbox, Box natively allows its users to create text documents that can be edited in real time with collaborators. This cloud storage service also offers the ability to edit text as well as other types of documents with Microsoft’s Office tools integration, which are like Google’s suite of productivity apps, but more akin to the legacy desktop apps that some are accustomed to using.
Dropbox Professional ups the capacity to 2TB, and adds several features on top of what you get with Plus. Most notably, you can recover deleted files and changes to said files for up to 120 days, Dropbox can keep your local files updated automatically via Smart Sync, and you can make a Showcase, a sort of themed portfolio for a batch of content that’s neatly designed and organized.

iDrive starts its offers with 5GB for free. That's OK, but if you want to make the most of it for backup, the real deal is in its Personal iDrive offerings.  These start at $52.12 for 2TB for a year or an even better deal of $74.62 5TB annually. There are also business packages with unlimited users, but the price goes up for less storage. For example, it's $74.62 for 250GB.
Cloud storage is a selective backup procedure where you choose which files to store online, and then you send them to your online account. When you delete a file on your computer that you backed up online, the file is still in your cloud storage account because it isn't actually tied to your computer anymore; it's just a single file that you uploaded online.
Google Drive offers plenty of plans to choose from. The free one gives you a whopping 15GB of storage and makes it fit for our list of the best free cloud storage offers. The paid plans start at 100GB and end at 30TB, but most aren’t good value. The 1TB plan costs $9.99 per month, which is the best one among them, but it’s still not close to, say, pCloud.
Jill Duffy is a contributing editor, specializing in productivity apps and software, as well as technologies for health and fitness. She writes the weekly Get Organized column, with tips on how to lead a better digital life. Her first book, Get Organized: How to Clean Up Your Messy Digital Life is available for Kindle, iPad, and other digital forma... See Full Bio
Cloud backup is when you install a program on your computer and tell it to keep specific files backed up online. Going a step further than cloud storage, a backup service will also upload any changes you make to the file so that the current version is always stored online. In other words, if you delete a file from your computer, it might also get deleted from your online backup account, and if you change a file on your computer, the online version changes too.

You can access your cloud files through an app or software installed on your computer (once it's installed, it's usually pretty much invisible), though you need an internet connection for it to work. If you temporarily don't have an internet connection, that's okay. The service waits until the next time you do have a connection and takes care of business then.
If you want to take OneDrive into your business, Microsoft stands ready to help with OneDrive for Business. This is not a storage plan, per se. But, like Google Drive has been merged into Google Docs, OneDrive for Business is a marriage of OneDrive and Office 365. With Office 365 Business, Business Essentials, or Business Premium plans, the prices start at $5 a user per month with an annual commitment. With any of these packages, you get 1TB of storage per user.
Microsoft OneDrive integrates with Office Online which you can use to collaborate with others no matter the plan you subscribe to. If you want to take notes and share them you can use OneNote. To communicate with others, there’s Skype which is integrated with the web client. Productivity apps include Forms for workflow management and Sway for content publishing.
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