Personal mobile devices, especially when used in Bring-Your-Own-Device (BYOD) scenarios, add new challenges to controlling the flow of sensitive documents and information. Capabilities such as remote wipe or digital rights management can go a long way in limiting how far information can spread outside of the organization, especially when these devices are lost or compromised. Some products offer these features out of the box, while others use third-party offerings to close this gap, such as Microsoft Windows Intune.
Enterprise Plan: Suitable for organizations with a large number of employees, the Enterprise Plan includes all feature of lower-priced plans along with unlimited storage space, and covers administrative packages that include AD/LDAP integration, SSO, role-based administration and multi-entity management. Pricing details are available through the Egnyte sales team.
You are collaborating with another research center on sensitive data but they are on the other side of the world. Your organization has very strict usage guidelines around data sharing … and so does your collaborator. With Federated Cloud Sharing from ownCloud, both organizations can maintain their individual control while sharing designated files and folders across time zones and geographies – all while maintaining the access at any time, from any device.
With an Apple Music family plan, your family can enjoy unlimited access to Apple Music on their devices.1 Everyone gets full access to the Apple Music library, with over 50 million songs. And each family member gets a private account with a personal music library and expert recommendations. Start your free three-month trial2 and enjoy a whole world of music for the whole family.
Disable auto-uploads. If you are concerned about sensitive info or pics, turn off the auto-upload function on services such as Dropbox or Google Photos. These services automatically save a backup version of your documents in the cloud but don't distinguish between everyday photos and files and the ones you really don't want getting into the wrong hands.
You’ll be taken to the Dropbox website, where you can add the email addresses of specific people you want to share the folder with. They’ll need a Dropbox account to access the folder. Once they’ve accepted, the folder will appear in every person’s Dropbox account and anyone can copy files to and remove file-s from the folder. It’s a great way to ensure you and a friend or colleague all have the same files. The files and any changes or removals will sync to each person’s PC automatically, just like any other Dropbox folder.
Backup and recovery is a critical part of ensuring data is protected and accessible, but keeping up with increasing capacity requirements can be a constant challenge. Cloud storage brings low cost, high durability, and extreme scale to backup and recovery solutions. Embedded data management policies like Amazon S3 Object Lifecycle Management can automatically migrate data to lower-cost tiers based on frequency or timing settings, and archival vaults can be created to help comply with legal or regulatory requirements. These benefits allow for tremendous scale possibilities within industries such as financial services, healthcare, and media that produce high volumes of data with long-term retention needs.
For some reason, OneDrive doesn’t include built-in sharing options in Windows 8.1’s File Explorer. You could use the OneDrive “Store app” to change these settings, but you’d probably prefer to use the website on your desktop. Windows 8.1’s OneDrive integration also doesn’t offer a way to sync folders and files shared with you to the desktop. You’ll have to access them in the web browser. OneDrive does offer all the same sharing settings as Dropbox and Google Drive, but you’ll need to use your browser — you may want to use Dropbox or Google Drive if Windows desktop integration is important to you.
Features: Knowing what features your cloud storage service supports is essential in choosing the right one for you. A comparison of the top free cloud storage services can help you decide between a few of the better ones. Beyond that, do some research on the company's websites to see what they offer, like if they support streaming media files from their website or mobile app, if that's something you require.

Google Drive is great for anyone who prefers Google’s ecosystem. The web giant thrives on integration with Google’s other services, like Gmail and Google Docs. In fact, Google recently re-branded some of its services, and now Google Drive actually integrates Google Docs, Sheets, and Slides. For the low, low price of absolutely nothing, you’ll get 15GB of Google Drive space for files, Gmail, and Google Photos. Upgrades cost $2/month for 100GB, $10/month for 1TB, and $100/month for 10TB. Mobile support includes iPhone, iPad, and Android.
Speaking of the people who use the cloud, out of the users we surveyed, 53 percent primarily use cloud storage for media and file sharing services. What did that tell us? That people aren’t looking purely for a backup service. We wanted our top picks to be well-rounded and empower users with the tools to share and collaborate work rather than focus on automated, system-level backups — so we nixed backup-focused services.
The range of capabilities of cloud-based storage services is incredible. Many of them specialize in a specific area. For example, Dropbox and SugarSync focus on keeping a synced folder accessible everywhere. SpiderOak emphasizes security. Some cloud storage services, such as Apple iCloud, Google Drive and Microsoft OneDrive, are generalists, offering not only folder and file syncing, but also media-playing and device syncing. These products even double as collaboration software, offering real-time document coediting.
Today, as far as file sharing goes, we have nearly endless options. Dropbox, Box, Google Drive, Microsoft OneDrive and Hightail – formerly YouSendIt – are among the services that enable you to share big files easily, as well as store them in the cloud, sync them across multiple devices, and collaborate on them with colleagues and clients. But there are plenty of others, ranging from basic services for consumers (Amazon Drive) to security-conscious, enterprise-level services (Tresorit). The services we've chosen are listed here in alphabetical order and focus on 10 that cover the range of options available. (This isn’t an exhaustive catalog of all services.) To check file transfer times for each, we uploaded a 195MB ZIP file using a connection with an average 11.88 megabit/second upload speed.
This service also offers on-the-go secure file access from any mobile device, including iOS, Android and Windows Phone. Downloaded files are instantly available on a user's mobile device, even when they're offline. CrashPlan also features customer versioning, an online management console, a desktop application and high-level security protection. The system offers plans for businesses and large enterprises.  www.crashplan.com
Price to upgrade: Paying $1 per month will add 50GB to your iCloud account. Apple matches Google One’s pricing with the next upgrades being 200GB and 2TB, which cost $2.99 per month and $9.99 per month, respectively. An extra 50GB in the cloud might be all that you need, but opting for 200GB or more will let you split the data among your family with iCloud’s Family Sharing feature.
Cloud backup is when you install a program on your computer and tell it to keep specific files backed up online. Going a step further than cloud storage, a backup service will also upload any changes you make to the file so that the current version is always stored online. In other words, if you delete a file from your computer, it might also get deleted from your online backup account, and if you change a file on your computer, the online version changes too.
File Storage - Some applications need to access shared files and require a file system. This type of storage is often supported with a Network Attached Storage (NAS) server. File storage solutions like Amazon Elastic File System (EFS) are ideal for use cases like large content repositories, development environments, media stores, or user home directories.
Today's winning teams need tomorrow's most innovative tools. With Box, all of your team's files — documents, images, videos and more — are stored securely in the cloud, so everyone in your organization can easily access, edit, share and comment on work from any device. And with enterprise-grade security underlying everything you do, Box gives you what you need to power a digital-first business.
Like its competitors, OneDrive offers an automatic photo-backup feature — and it’s actually pretty great. The Photo menu does a good job of automatically grouping your image files according to some predefined tags. For example, one of our testers went pond fishing this past spring, and the pictures of him in a boat were tagged “#Outdoor” and the landscape photos of the lake were tagged “#Waterfront.” OneDrive’s browser client even lets you ship image files directly to the nearest Walgreens for prints when you want them.
Microsoft doesn’t offer encryption services for personal OneDrive accounts; business and SharePoint online are the company’s only encrypted online storage platforms. This means if you want to use your own personal account through Microsoft’s cloud and not have to deal with potentially compromised information, you might have to encrypt your own data to ensure your files are secure. In addition, the company’s history of battling “privacy concerns” goes hand-in-hand with its reputation for tracking users without transparent disclosure.
We know that most people are staunchly team Apple or team PC. Cloud storage, regardless the type, should let you have the freedom to access and import the data you want from wherever you are, using whatever device you choose. Some of the contenders we considered didn’t offer services to Windows and OS X, Android and iOS -- if that was the case, we put them on the chopping block.
ShareFile, which Citrix acquired in 2011, creates a custom file-sharing site for your business, so you can share files easily with clients, partners, co-workers and others. The service offers numerous compelling features and tools for business users, including workflow management, document collaboration, e-signatures and integration with Microsoft Outlook and Gmail. Security is robust, too, with up to 256-bit AES encryption and customizable permissions settings.
“Dropbox has saved my business from the blue screen of death. Now anyone in my company can access critical documents from anywhere. We pay for Dropbox for business so that we can have extra room to store 16 years of data about our company and clients. We have team member folders and we use it to store a repository of graphics and images that we use on the blog and to promote the brand as well. I really love how easy it is to use.”

There’s also a “shares” page that tells you which folders you have shared and with whom. Sync.com does link sharing properly. You can attach passwords as well as expiry dates to links, those that latter bit requires a Pro subscription. A couple of rare but handy share features that Sync.com provides are setting download limits on shares and viewing download stats.

In terms of sharing data, at a minimum, this should take the form of a sync client, meaning software that resides on each registered client and which takes care of making sure data in the cloud is synced with any local replicas. But it can also have other points of access. For instance, Microsoft OneDrive for Business syncs with the Team sites that are part of the popular Microsoft SharePoint collaboration platform, while Box for Business offers a fully functional web client with drag-and-drop support. Shared data can be stored in folders originated by individuals or in team folders that are created by team leads or administrators (and are accessible to anyone on the team). Some version of team folders should be considered a necessary component of any business-grade cloud storage app. By creating central points of collaboration that don't originate from any one user, it becomes easier to grant and revoke access as well as pass on ownership when an individual leaves the organization or changes divisions.
There is also a feature that allows you to remotely access files on another PC via the OneDrive website. If privacy is a major concern then it should be noted that Microsoft reserve the right to scan your files to look for what it would deem objectionable content. This could be copyrighted material or things of an explicit nature. Apple has a similar policy, making the two potentially more intrusive than their competitors.
iCloud requires iOS 5 or later on iPhone 3GS or later, iPod touch (3rd generation or later), iPad Pro, iPad or later, iPad Air or later, or iPad mini or later; a Mac computer with OS X Lion 10.7.5 or later; or a PC with Windows 7 or Windows 8 (Outlook 2007 or later or an up-to-date browser is required for accessing email, contacts, and calendars). Some features require iOS 11 and macOS High Sierra. Some features require a Wi-Fi connection. Some features are not available in all countries or regions. Access to some services is limited to 10 devices.
iCloud also acts as a media sharing hub that works closely with Apple’s cloud-based productivity suite, iWork. It includes a word processor, among other things that can be shared with other iCloud users, all with an interface that looks a bit cleaner and more modular than Google Docs. Still, Apple can’t compete with Google’s price point or the universality of Google accounts.
Zoolz is less well known than other firms in this guide, but it's been operating for six years and has more than four million customers as well as high-profile business clients. It has decent feedback on Google reviews and specialist site Cloudwards. As with all storage services though there's always some element of risk, so weigh this up before uploading any sensitive documents.

What I really like about Dropbox is that I can use it just like it was any other network drive, with pretty much any file manager on any operating system. Unlike the other services, there are no extras. Dropbox offers file storage without any frills. Sometimes that's all you need, and since it lets you easily get to your most important files no matter what device you're using, I find it extremely handy.
Another real nice feature is, unlike many other cloud-backup services, iDrive doesn't lock you down to a single computer. You can use one account to backup your Windows and macOS desktops, your Android smartphone and iPhones and tablets, and network drives. There's also a Linux backup option, but it's meant for Linux servers. There is no Linux personal storage.
In this scenario, a company's marketing analyst wants to use Cloud Storage to back up confidential revenue forecasts and sales projection data. The data must be accessible only by the marketing analyst. The company's IT department oversees and manages the company's Cloud Storage account. Their primary management responsibilities include creating and sharing buckets so that various departments throughout the company have access to Cloud Storage.
Apple's iCloud service includes iCloud Photo Sharing, which lets you share images and video with friends, family, and colleagues on an iPhone, iPad, Mac, PC, or Apple TV. While technically considered part of iCloud Photo Library, iCloud Photo Sharing exists outside of the service: You don't have to use iCloud Photo Library to share your images, and shared albums don't count toward your iCloud storage.
Dropbox offers flexible pricing plans that can be used by organizations of all sizes. It uses off-site servers for file storage and sharing. The solution allows you to automatically sync your files online and across the devices you use. Files can be managed as you do on your desktop. The software allows you to access your files on secure servers from multiple devices such as desktop, Mac, iPhone, Android, and Windows Phone. More than 500 million users around the world have signed up to use Dropbox’s services.
Note: When using groups to manage access to your resources, you should be aware of Group policies and limits that determine how many members can be in the group. If you need to invite more users than can be added to a group, you can create a service that authenticates users and redirects them to a URL signed by a service account. For more information, see Signed URLs (query string authentication).
However, don’t be confused by the numbers or their marketing message.  Since all of them allude to similar benefits and user scenarios when you buy into their business solutions – unlock the power of cloud storage to save space, boost collaboration and team working in the workplace.  At the core of these applications, there is one key feature – a folder that sync’s really well.  They offer a simple user interface with a familiar approach to file storage (folders) that can be ‘accessed anywhere’, a key benefit of remote cloud storage.  Additionally, they provide a more convenient way of sharing files than the archaic email attachment.  Unfortunately, these public cloud platforms have been designed and best serve the individual end user for handling and sharing personal files like photos and videos among trusted family, friends and colleagues.  Therefore, lacks all the important security and configuration features that are crucial for enterprise file management and collaboration.
Users with specific records-keeping requirements, such as public agencies that must retain electronic records according to statute, may encounter complications with using cloud computing and storage. For instance, the U.S. Department of Defense designated the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) to maintain a list of records management products that meet all of the records retention, personally identifiable information (PII), and security (Information Assurance; IA) requirements[23]
×