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No one is more aware of data breaches than cloud-service providers. Most recently, Adobe, Apple's iCloud, Dropbox, Snapchat, and others who rely on cloud access and storage have had not only passwords stolen, but also personal data—despite assurances from providers that their cloud is secure. Services assure users that data is encrypted in the cloud; however, the keeper of the encryption certificates is often a third-party provider. Intruders tend to target failures such as poor key management, lack of end-user training, or a failure of physical security (e.g., leaving your laptop unattended in a public place).
Best Answer: Overall, Microsoft OneDrive has the best value if you're going to pay, at 1TB for $6.99 a month, and that includes an Office 365 subscription. For the most space and versatility without having to ever pay a dime, then you can't go wrong with Google Drive's free 15GB. Mega is another good option for the most free storage right out of the gate (50GB), however, while it offers end-to-end encryption on your files, it's not as versatile with third-party integrations like other services.
Storing your files in the cloud has many advantages. You can view your files from any phone, tablet or computer that's connected to the Internet, and the cloud can also provide backup for files so they'll never disappear if your phone gets lost or your computer crashes. Using the cloud is a no-brainer, but picking which service to use is a bit more difficult.
Yes, there are a lot of things that could go wrong (take the Yahoo and Equifax data breaches, for example), but that doesn’t mean you have to live in fear of the cloud — just be smart with your data. Our top recommendations offer cutting-edge protection: two-factor authentication, facilities that are protected with 24-hour monitoring, and data that’s encrypted in “transit” (SSL and TLS) and “at rest” (128-bit AES and on).
While some of us are better off than others, personal users aren’t big companies capable of dishing out hundreds or thousands of dollars for computer services annually. We’re going to make sure the services are affordable for the average Joe. The more storage the service provides for the money, the better the deal. It’s great if they offer a free plan or trial, too.
Cloud storage is a model of computer data storage in which the digital data is stored in logical pools. The physical storage spans multiple servers (sometimes in multiple locations), and the physical environment is typically owned and managed by a hosting company. These cloud storage providers are responsible for keeping the data available and accessible, and the physical environment protected and running. People and organizations buy or lease storage capacity from the providers to store user, organization, or application data.
AWS Backup is a fully managed backup service that makes it easy to centralize and automate the back up of data across AWS services in the cloud as well as on premises using the AWS Storage Gateway. Using AWS Backup, you can centrally configure backup policies and monitor backup activity for AWS resources, such as Amazon EBS volumes, Amazon RDS databases, Amazon DynamoDB tables, Amazon EFS file systems, and AWS Storage Gateway volumes.
Apple’s cloud pricing has dropped dramatically over the last two years, including a deep cut at this week’s WWDC developer conference. And as with many Apple offerings, it’s most useful if you’ve bought into the rest of the ecosystem. It keeps your photos, notes, calendar, and more backed up across all of your devices—unless you use, say, and Android phone, for which there’s no official support.
Assuming you can convince your clients to adopt a new solution for file management—which might involve taking deliverables outside of their control (their cloud storage) and keeping it on a solution you set up—then I agree, it makes the most sense to consolidate everything you’re doing to a single service, rather than having to deal with a bunch of services simultaneously.
Katherine Murray is a technology writer and the author of more than 60 books on a variety of topics, ranging from small business technology to green computing to blogging to Microsoft Office 2010. Her most recent books include Microsoft Office 2010 Plain & Simple (Microsoft Press, 2010), Microsoft Word 2010 Plain & Simple (Microsoft Press, 2010), and Microsoft Word 2010 Inside Out (Microsoft Press, 2010).
Amazon’s Unlimited Everything plan truly was unprecedented when the company announced it in 2015, and went unmatched ever since. For $60 per year, you could keep as much as you could muster in your own private Amazon cloud locker. The industry standard, then and now, is roughly $10 per month for 1TB of space. Which is to say, twice as much as Amazon’s offering had been, with a firm cap, instead of all-you-can-cloud.
With an Apple Music family plan, your family can enjoy unlimited access to Apple Music on their devices.1 Everyone gets full access to the Apple Music library, with over 50 million songs. And each family member gets a private account with a personal music library and expert recommendations. Start your free three-month trial2 and enjoy a whole world of music for the whole family.
Today's winning teams need tomorrow's most innovative tools. With Box, all of your team's files — documents, images, videos and more — are stored securely in the cloud, so everyone in your organization can easily access, edit, share and comment on work from any device. And with enterprise-grade security underlying everything you do, Box gives you what you need to power a digital-first business.

It also has a feature that troubles me; SkyDrive will let you grab files from any PC that's associated with your account and pull them into the cloud remotely. That's great if you left your PowerPoint presentation at home. That's not so great if someone gets your Microsoft account login information and your phone for SkyDrive's two-factor authentication code and decides to start downloading your Quicken finance files. You can turn this function off, but it's set to be on by default. This seems like a potential security hole to me.


Accidentally delete a file or save a new version of a file you’re not happy with? No problem. Dropbox stores copies of all deleted files and folders for 30 days—or as many as 120 days for Dropbox Business users—including previous versions of files, so you can easily recover them. We also provide confirmation warnings on the desktop when team members move or delete files. They’ll know what happens when they take action, and fewer files will be lost accidentally.
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