Dropbox was among the first services to offer seamless upload and storage via its client software (though Box beat Dropbox to market by two years). The service is enhanced with an impressive ecosystem of third-party apps that integrate with Dropbox, including Salesforce, DocuSign, Jira Software, Office 365 and Slack. And though Dropbox has primarily focused on consumers and SMBs, its recent IPO filing document states that the company has ambitions for the enterprise market (and already has some large business customers). Dropbox gets high marks for being easy to use, and its growing collaboration features, such as the new Showcase interface for sharing files with partners and clients, continue to improve. Its free plan only offers 2GB of storage, however – a pittance compared to Google Drive’s 15GB.
Hightail helps professionals around the world securely share and control files from anywhere for more effective and efficient collaboration. Users can send files of any size from their computer or mobile device and control exactly who sees them. Users can also share "spaces" – project folders that are each assigned a unique link for sharing with clients and team members – and assign editing and updating permissions. Hightail offers unlimited storage space and both mobile and desktop apps so files can be accessed from anywhere.
You can access your cloud files through an app or software installed on your computer (once it's installed, it's usually pretty much invisible), though you need an internet connection for it to work. If you temporarily don't have an internet connection, that's okay. The service waits until the next time you do have a connection and takes care of business then.
SugarSync is another multiplatform-friendly cloud offering that enables you to back up, synchronize, and share files on Windows and Mac computers and on a wide range of devices (iPad, iPhone, BlackBerry, Windows Mobile, Android, and Symbian). SugarSync seems to stand out a bit in the mobile realm; you can upload and sync files by email and sync your folders to your mobile device, which is great if you do lots of your work on the road. SugarSync offers a 5GB free account. You can also choose plans ranging from 30GB for $4.99/month to 250GB, which will put you back $24.99 each month.

One adult in your household — the organizer — chooses the features your family will share and invites up to five family members to join. Your family can share iTunes, Apple Books, and App Store purchases, an Apple Music family subscription, a single iCloud storage plan, and more. Once family members join, Family Sharing is set up on everyone’s devices automatically.

Drive is more than a cloud storage service; it’s a powerful, collaborative office suite that wraps all of Google’s services into a neat little package — we considered it one of the best file sharing and storage sites. You can create spreadsheets, documents, presentations, Google Forms and connect to a whole slew of third-party apps — everything you do syncs conveniently into your account as long as you have an internet connection. And if you don’t have a connection -- all you have to do is enable offline access and use the Google Drive extension for Chrome.
Signing up for an individual account at Box gives you 10GB of cloud storage, which is a good start. Similar to Dropbox, Box natively allows its users to create text documents that can be edited in real time with collaborators. This cloud storage service also offers the ability to edit text as well as other types of documents with Microsoft’s Office tools integration, which are like Google’s suite of productivity apps, but more akin to the legacy desktop apps that some are accustomed to using.

Many cloud storage services have a free account that usually comes with some limitations, such as the amount of storage they provide or a size limit on files you can upload. We prefer services that offer some level of free service (even if it's only 2GB) rather than a time-based trial, because that lets you fully integrate a service into your life for several weeks while you get a feel for how it works and what might go wrong with your particular setup.


As an example, IDriveSync works really well with social networks. They have an integrated sharing tool that can share to Facebook as a post. This can be helpful to those who need a safe place to store files and want to share out some of them publicly. Since the share button is built into the interface it is pretty easy to share files to social networks.
In this scenario, a company's marketing analyst wants to use Cloud Storage to back up confidential revenue forecasts and sales projection data. The data must be accessible only by the marketing analyst. The company's IT department oversees and manages the company's Cloud Storage account. Their primary management responsibilities include creating and sharing buckets so that various departments throughout the company have access to Cloud Storage.

There are several services to pick from, and some of them are pretty similar. While common at their core offerings (to give you copious amounts of space to store files online), only a few go beyond that by giving users more free storage upfront, useful online productivity tools, and the option to expand storage well above the 1TB mark. Here are the most popular services and how to determine which one is right for you.


Personal mobile devices, especially when used in Bring-Your-Own-Device (BYOD) scenarios, add new challenges to controlling the flow of sensitive documents and information. Capabilities such as remote wipe or digital rights management can go a long way in limiting how far information can spread outside of the organization, especially when these devices are lost or compromised. Some products offer these features out of the box, while others use third-party offerings to close this gap, such as Microsoft Windows Intune.
Quick take: This service lets you upload as many photos (though just photos) as you want. However, Sony downsizes the images to about 3-megapixels, which roughly translates to a 6x5-inch print at 300 dpi. There’s no paid storage option. It may not be an ideal solution, but because it’s free, the service can serve as a smart secondary or tertiary backup plan because it allows for automatic photo uploads through your smartphone.
Some providers have their own data centers while others actually outsource their storage to another third-party cloud, often Amazon Web Services (AWS) or a similar Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) player. That's an important point to consider: Are you signing a service-level agreement (SLA) with a cloud provider that's directly responsible for the infrastructure or is the provider beholden to another party? If it's a third party, make sure to investigate that firm and examine its track record. Then, look at the levels of service it offers. For example, while all of the major offerings have some level of uptime guarantee, it is worth noting that location is an important factor. How many data centers does the third party have? And is your data distributed among them for better reliability or does that come at an additional cost?
Dropbox was hacked in 2012 and after that, a list of Dropbox user’s logins has been published on the internet.  Cyber-attacks can come from any number of directions and a comprehensive plan to ensure cyber security across the enterprise is necessary.  Cyber threats are too pervasive and public cloud platforms which hold millions of user’s files and data are an obvious target for cyber-attacks. Since consumer experience has become a dominant driving force in product development, products these days are built more for reliability than security.  A possible data breach like that can affect not only the hacked platform but many others since people tend to use the same password across multiple business apps.  A data breach can cost companies millions or even put them out of business.  Therefore, is it worth the risk to introduce public platforms into your enterprise?
The range of capabilities of cloud-based storage services is incredible. Many of them specialize in a specific area. For example, Dropbox and SugarSync focus on keeping a synced folder accessible everywhere. SpiderOak emphasizes security. Some cloud storage services, such as Apple iCloud, Google Drive and Microsoft OneDrive, are generalists, offering not only folder and file syncing, but also media-playing and device syncing. These products even double as collaboration software, offering real-time document coediting.
If you want to build your business around Google Drive, you can do that too. Google Drive for Work includes unlimited storage for files, folders, and backups for $8 per user per month plus $0.04 per GB. With it, you can sync all your business files, including Microsoft Office files, across your computer, smartphone, and tablet to access your work whenever you need it.

roles/storage.legacyBucketOwner The bucket finance-marketing IT staff Giving the IT staff the roles/storage.legacyBucketOwner role for the bucket allows them to perform common bucket management tasks, such as deleting objects and changing the IAM policy on the bucket. It also allows the IT staff to list the contents of the finance-marketing bucket, but not view or download any of the contents.
Only ownCloud can connect federated servers in multiple geographic locations into a single user experience for seamless collaboration. Leveraging newly enhanced server to server APIs, users of any ownCloud server can now search for users of any other federated ownCloud from any client – mobile, desktop or web. Sharing is as simple as two clicks and entering the recipient’s name. Access is completely logged on all servers, and can be revoked by the file owner at any time. Further, since each ownCloud is a standalone system, access policies and rules are still respected among Federated servers, enabling each server to be managed to the policies of the host company.

Social sharing is the process of posting shared content to your social networking profile (such as Facebook or Twitter) for your friends and followers to see. The reason people like sharing on social networks is because it's quick and easy. One benefit of social network sharing is that you already have an established list of friends and followers. Which you do not have to sort through a long list of email addresses to create a share list. Also with social sharing, your shared files are public which means you do not have to create a user account.
So after sizing up the actual needs and priorities of your company, choose a secure solution for your data handling needs that also fits your budget and is aimed at enterprise data management and not limited to one department. The price of effective data management will be cheaper than the alternative – the cost of losing productivity, data, and security.

Enter BOX. The speeds were about twice as fast as Dropbox (this is web browser upload/download operations – not background sync which you can’t tell the speeds very well anyway since it’s background – but sometimes we have tight deadlines with huge amounts of data to share.) And there’s an embed widget generator that works great. The number of setting is insance giving you granular control over many aspects of how your account is setup. Plus you get unlimited storage. Our opinion in the end was that BOX was far superior to both Google Drive and Dropbox.

Dropbox gained popularity as a free consumer tool that enterprise IT often restricted, but the service has grown to provide features that businesses need, including encryption and integration with Microsoft Office 365. Administrators can allow or disallow external users access to information, and the Dropbox for Business tier offers remote wipe, ability to lock folders, and an audit functionality for monitoring user activity and file sharing. The tool is known for its ease of use and automatic sync and share. and has a wide variety of extensions and APIs for flexibility.
For Pre-registered user sharing Box is a good example. They provide an interface for collaborating and sharing files between users. It's most useful for teams and groups that are using a set of files that are consistently being updated between users. Sharing within this program gives you a few more options than other sharing, such as real-time file editing and permission levels.
While cloud storage sounds like it has something to do with weather fronts and storm systems, it really refers to saving data to an off-site storage system maintained by a third party. Instead of storing information to your computer's hard drive or other local storage device, you save it to a remote database. The Internet provides the connection between your computer and the database.
Nextcloud is a different type of cloud storage. It works a lot like Resilio Sync. You create your own Nextcloud server on your own computer. The app lets you sync files between your computer and your phone. It operates exactly like your typical cloud storage, but you control where the files go and what happens when they get there. It's an excellent resource for people who like the idea of cloud storage, but don't want their files in the servers of some other company. Plus, you get as much cloud storage as you have storage on your computer. The is free to use for personal use. There are enterprise options for businesses as well.

This might sound like a silly comment, but here goes: If the clients are the ones with all the different online storage systems, why are you paying for different subscriptions? It’s not like you’re buying an “unlimited” account with Google, for example, that allows you to store anything you want on another company’s Google Drive. Said company runs and pays for the storage, and creates user accounts for others to access it as it sees fit.

Since the advent of the internet, the technology industry has been steadily moving away from local storage to remote, server-based storage and processing—what is known as the cloud. Look at music and movies: We used to play them from local media, but now they're streamed from servers. By keeping your own documents and media files in the cloud, you can reap the same advantages of anywhere-access and sharing. Productivity gains and reduced local storage requirements are additional benefits. We've rounded up the best cloud storage and file-sharing and file-syncing services to help you decide which are right for you.
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