SugarSync makes it easy for users to sync and share only a few folders or entire libraries across multiple devices. The folders and files are backed up in real time, enabling all devices linked to the account to show recent changes and updates. The service is compatible with multiple computing systems including Mac, PC, iOS, and Android devices. You can start working on a document on your office computer and finish it at home on your iPad.


Mega is the sequel to the now-defunct Megaupload, a cloud storage service that was taken down by the authorities a couple of years ago. Mega is an up-and-coming service that gives users 50GB for free. That's the largest sign-on bonus we've seen among all of these cloud storage apps and services. It comes with a range of storage options that span from 200GB to 8TB. The app is quite flashy but there are a few bugs here and there that some people have experienced. Its biggest feature is that it encrypts all files uploaded to it for added security and protection.
In terms of sharing data, at a minimum, this should take the form of a sync client, meaning software that resides on each registered client and which takes care of making sure data in the cloud is synced with any local replicas. But it can also have other points of access. For instance, Microsoft OneDrive for Business syncs with the Team sites that are part of the popular Microsoft SharePoint collaboration platform, while Box for Business offers a fully functional web client with drag-and-drop support. Shared data can be stored in folders originated by individuals or in team folders that are created by team leads or administrators (and are accessible to anyone on the team). Some version of team folders should be considered a necessary component of any business-grade cloud storage app. By creating central points of collaboration that don't originate from any one user, it becomes easier to grant and revoke access as well as pass on ownership when an individual leaves the organization or changes divisions.
Because all of the company’s services are integrated with Drive, they dip from the same 15GB pot you get with the free account. For us, that’s not enough; one of our testers had amassed almost 10GB just in archived emails in his personal account over the past five years, which would leave him with only 5GB of space for everything else. If he were a photo-fanatic, that wouldn’t be a whole lot of space.
Business Plan: This tier is designed to offer cross-site collaboration to businesses with 25 to 100 employees. In addition to features available in the Office plan, the plan also includes 10 TB storage, multifactor authentication, integration packages, centralized device management, and mobile security features. The price is $15 per user per month.
When your family sets up purchase sharing, all new iTunes, Apple Books, and App Store purchases will be billed to the organizer’s account. But the organizer can still call the shots. Just turn on Ask to Buy for children in the family. When a child initiates a purchase, an alert is sent to the organizer, who can review the download and approve or decline it right from the organizer’s device. This applies to both purchases and free downloads.

EBS is designed for workloads that require persistent storage accessible by single EC2 instances. Typical use cases include relational and NoSQL databases (like Microsoft SQL Server and MySQL or Cassandra and MongoDB), Big Data analytics engines (like the Hadoop/HDFS ecosystem and Amazon EMR), stream and log processing applications (like Kafka and Splunk), and data warehousing applications (like Vertica and Teradata).
That sounds great, but it can actually be very confusing, even for dedicated Apple fans like Chris Maxcer of MacNewsWorld, who found that iCloud's constant syncing of files from all his devices with full read/write permissions and an inability to tell what was on the cloud and what wasn't, had him wanting to throw his "iPhone into the street", and then to run out in traffic so he could stomp it into oblivion. I feel his pain.
Saves time. Business owners and the average person can save a great deal of time, thanks to sharing files via the cloud. Now, there’s no need to save the files to a device, transport that device and insert that device into a computer in order to access the files. With just a few clicks of a button, files can instantly be shared. Talk about a huge time saver.
Price to upgrade: Amazon offers several upgrades that are priced competitively to Google One. For $11.99 per year, you can upgrade your account to 100GB. If you want more, 1TB costs $59.99 per year, and 2TB doubles that price. If your work requires a lot of cloud storage, Amazon Drive is the way to go, since it offers 30TB of storage for $1,799.70 per year compared to Google’s price of approximately $3,588 for the same amount.

Enterprise Plan: Suitable for organizations with a large number of employees, the Enterprise Plan includes all feature of lower-priced plans along with unlimited storage space, and covers administrative packages that include AD/LDAP integration, SSO, role-based administration and multi-entity management. Pricing details are available through the Egnyte sales team.
Files stored on the cloud can usually be shared using a Public URL. Public URL's are a direct link to your file or folder. Usually the service provider will have a user interface that any user can access on their website. This allows recipients to easily access files you send them. With a link, you can post it any where making it extremely versatile. It's also easy to use and, since it's public, anyone can access it.
Dropbox boasts excellent sharing abilities. Invite someone to share a particular Dropbox folder with you and that folder will appear right on their desktop. You can also send a link to an individual document or image. In addition, folders full of images can be viewed as a gallery, making Dropbox a viable photo-sharing alternative to Imgur and Flickr.
Storing data in the cloud can raise concerns about regulation and compliance, especially if this data is already stored in compliant storage systems. Cloud data compliance controls like Amazon Glacier Vault Lock are designed to ensure that you can easily deploy and enforce compliance controls on individual data vaults via a lockable policy. You can specify controls such as Write Once Read Many (WORM) to lock the data from future edits. Using audit log products like AWS CloudTrail can help you ensure compliance and governance objectives for your cloud-based storage and archival systems are being met.
Hightail plays well with other file sharing services, too. You can drag and drop files into a Space from your computer, Dropbox, Google Drive and OneDrive. Hightail is versatile, with third-party app integration, apps for iOS and Android, and macOS and Windows apps, with automatic desktop folder syncing. There are two different types of plans: file sharing and creative collaboration, which includes file sharing and additional features with plans starting at $125/month.

ADrive delivers businesses and enterprise-level online cloud storage services. It gives users the ability to edit documents online, maintain multiuser accounts and engage in multiple concurrent sessions. The business plan starts with 200 GB of storage capacity, Additional services include online collaboration, remote file transfer and 24/7 technical support. Features also include increased security and file history recovery. ADrive offers both personal and business plans.  www.adrive.com
Distinct from but overlapping in some cases with cloud storage are online backup services. Some of these, such as Carbonite, are all about disaster recovery, while IDrive combines that goal with syncing and sharing capabilities. If you want to bypass the cloud for your backup, you can still go with local backup software, which saves you the time it takes to upload and download your data.

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Google Drive’s standout features are its sharing and collaboration tools. Thanks to integration with Gmail and other Google services, you can share files with a click, with or without requiring a password. When you work with partners on the same word file, spreadsheet, or presentation, either separately or right at the same time, Google Drive marks the contributions of each person with different colored labels to make clear what has changed.


roles/storage.legacyBucketOwner The bucket finance-marketing IT staff Giving the IT staff the roles/storage.legacyBucketOwner role for the bucket allows them to perform common bucket management tasks, such as deleting objects and changing the IAM policy on the bucket. It also allows the IT staff to list the contents of the finance-marketing bucket, but not view or download any of the contents.
To know how to tailor your cloud storage search, you’ll need to know how much available data you want at your fingertips. Are you sharing files all the time? Are you uploading photos (which are bigger files than documents) constantly and wanting to maintain their resolution? Once you have a decent idea of what you use on a daily basis, you’ll be able to narrow your search based on data storage availability and price.
Security is obviously an important element in any online service. Knowhow encrypts data in transit using TLS to fend off any interceptions, and the Briefcase files are encrypted on the users machine as well. Files on the Knowhow servers are not stored in an encrypted form, but Knowhow assure us that they remain very secure behind several layers of protection and are unidentifiable to any snoopers.
For instance, Amazon offers 100GB for $12 per year. That’s double the storage space available from Apple’s iCloud for the same price. However, if you own a MacBook, an iPad, or an iPhone, you may prefer to remain within the Apple ecosystem for access to apps such as Pages or Sheets. The same holds true for fans of the Microsoft and Google ecosystems. In the end, paying a bit of a premium might be worth it to keep things simple.
Whether you’re looking for a personal or business account, it’s in the best interest of any cloud storage service to offer a free version (hello, roping in new users), but it’s also a win for us consumers, especially when it comes to free encrypted cloud storage (hello, security). Many personal users won’t need the space provided in a premium plan, and plenty of services offer a free version that’ll more than satisfy — why pay when you don’t have to?
Quick take: This service lets you upload as many photos (though just photos) as you want. However, Sony downsizes the images to about 3-megapixels, which roughly translates to a 6x5-inch print at 300 dpi. There’s no paid storage option. It may not be an ideal solution, but because it’s free, the service can serve as a smart secondary or tertiary backup plan because it allows for automatic photo uploads through your smartphone.
Traditionally, businesses of all sizes and industries would store all their important files on a special computer called a server that they housed and operated themselves. Cloud file storage solutions like ShareFile allow your business to store important files on secure servers that you can access through the internet. While this may not seem like a huge difference, it can have profound effects for your business.

Before I get to the answer, a quick note. We’re reaching the end of the year for Lifehacker’s tech advice column, Tech 911, and the mailbag is looking like the inverse of Santa’s sack—which is to say, please send me any and all tech-related questions you have, especially if they relate to things you’ve received (or are about to buy for yourself) this holiday season. I am here to help you! Let me help you.
CrashPlan combines online storage with complete backup services. The service backs up changed information as often as every minute and continues to watch for changes to data in real time. After the first backup completes, CrashPlan checks for data that is already backed up and ignores it, making subsequent backups much smaller because they contain only new or changed information.

Like Dropbox, Google Drive automatically syncs with the cloud so that everything is consistent across all of your devices. Also, like Dropbox, it integrates with Windows and Mac file systems. I'm sorry — and annoyed — to report that, despite many promises, Google Drive still doesn't natively support Linux. Come on, Google, get off the stick! Google Drive does, however, support Google's own Chrome OS, Android, and Apple's iOS.
On the whole, the interface across the apps is intuitive. You can choose specific files to be available offline on the mobile versions, and these can be edited - if they were created in Google Docs - then synced when you connect to the internet again. For other formats (such as Word) you’ll need to open them in another app - thus creating a duplicate copy.
Business Plan: This tier is designed to offer cross-site collaboration to businesses with 25 to 100 employees. In addition to features available in the Office plan, the plan also includes 10 TB storage, multifactor authentication, integration packages, centralized device management, and mobile security features. The price is $15 per user per month.
If you don’t have a pressing reason to choose another service, then it’s hard to go wrong with OneDrive. Furthermore, if you’ve bought into Microsoft’s Windows 10 ecosystem, then OneDrive is the best solution for you. It touts a decent amount of free space (5GB), along with inexpensive upgrades and the ability to get 1TB of storage with an Office 365 subscription. Microsoft’s cross-platform strategy means that mobile support is very strong, including Windows phones, Android, iPhone, and iPad.
You’ll be taken to the Dropbox website, where you can add the email addresses of specific people you want to share the folder with. They’ll need a Dropbox account to access the folder. Once they’ve accepted, the folder will appear in every person’s Dropbox account and anyone can copy files to and remove file-s from the folder. It’s a great way to ensure you and a friend or colleague all have the same files. The files and any changes or removals will sync to each person’s PC automatically, just like any other Dropbox folder.

SugarSync has a slightly confusing usage model. Unlike, say, Dropbox, you can designate any file folders on your hard drive to be synced to the cloud; you don’t need to keep everything in a designated folder. To sync folders, you right-click them (after installing the SugarSync desktop client). But just in case you want a designated folder, the service automatically creates a syncing folder on your computer called My SugarSync (formerly Magic Briefcase). As of now, there are no collaborative editing tools – or even two-factor authentication, either of which could be a deal breaker for business users. Also worth noting: Aside from a free 5GB trial (good for 90 days), there’s no free plan.
Price to upgrade: Amazon offers several upgrades that are priced competitively to Google One. For $11.99 per year, you can upgrade your account to 100GB. If you want more, 1TB costs $59.99 per year, and 2TB doubles that price. If your work requires a lot of cloud storage, Amazon Drive is the way to go, since it offers 30TB of storage for $1,799.70 per year compared to Google’s price of approximately $3,588 for the same amount.
Quick take: That 10GB of free storage is generous compared with the plans of other services on this list. Box also offers a Personal Pro plan with 100GB of storage for $10 per month. Box lacks features such as tagging powered by artificial intelligence and photo-editing software, however. And you have to pay the monthly fee to unlock the automatic uploading feature.
It also has a feature that troubles me; SkyDrive will let you grab files from any PC that's associated with your account and pull them into the cloud remotely. That's great if you left your PowerPoint presentation at home. That's not so great if someone gets your Microsoft account login information and your phone for SkyDrive's two-factor authentication code and decides to start downloading your Quicken finance files. You can turn this function off, but it's set to be on by default. This seems like a potential security hole to me.

Mozy offers cloud backup, sync and mobile access for computers and servers for individuals, businesses and enterprise IT services. Mozy's sync services are simple because they keep every file updated throughout the day. Mozy features include automatic cloud backup, mobile access, military-grade security, data restore capabilities, server backups and data management.


Tresorit offers a variety of personal, business and enterprise plans. It’s fairly easy to use, and you can designate any folder (called a ‘Tresor’) on your hard drive for syncing. But with no free file storage/syncing option and plans starting at $10.42/month for 200GB of storage, Tresoit is by no means your least expensive option. The free trial period is only two weeks and requires a credit card.
This cloud data protection service features enterprise-level backup features, including large storage capacities, advanced retention policies and bare metal recovery. Storage Guardian supports hybrid systems for faster recovery in the event of an internet outage. It can also backup virtual machines and several other cloud storage and file sharing platforms, including Microsoft Office 365 and Google Drive.
Two of the oldest cloud storage file sharing platforms on the market nowadays are SugarSync and Box.com, both launched in 2005.  Followed by Google Docs in 2006 and OneDrive in 2007. Dropbox has reached an incredibly high number of users, 300 million since launch in 2007. Google Drive has 240 million users and according to Microsoft, OneDrive has more than 250 million users.  These applications have been highly adopted as they are very easy to use and accessible to anyone.  With most vendors leading with their ‘Freemium’ pricing strategy, by which a product or service is provided free of charge, it’s a no-brainer for anyone who is looking to implement and trial cloud storage for themselves.
Carbonite is the best outlet for unlimited storage space — perfect for anyone who has thousands of high-resolution photos, or large collections of movies or other media. This cloud-based service automatically uploads all the files you want (under 4GB — anything bigger must be uploaded manually) to the cloud from a variety of devices. Automatic backups will keep your recent photos and files secure.
SugarSync has a slightly confusing usage model. Unlike, say, Dropbox, you can designate any file folders on your hard drive to be synced to the cloud; you don’t need to keep everything in a designated folder. To sync folders, you right-click them (after installing the SugarSync desktop client). But just in case you want a designated folder, the service automatically creates a syncing folder on your computer called My SugarSync (formerly Magic Briefcase). As of now, there are no collaborative editing tools – or even two-factor authentication, either of which could be a deal breaker for business users. Also worth noting: Aside from a free 5GB trial (good for 90 days), there’s no free plan.
Designed with small businesses in mind, the Acronis Backup features single-pass disk imaging that protects everything in one simple step. It can also recover anything and restore systems to different hardware without worrying about compatibilities. Acronis has its own cloud servers, but also works with the public or private hosts of your choosing.  
Nextcloud is a different type of cloud storage. It works a lot like Resilio Sync. You create your own Nextcloud server on your own computer. The app lets you sync files between your computer and your phone. It operates exactly like your typical cloud storage, but you control where the files go and what happens when they get there. It's an excellent resource for people who like the idea of cloud storage, but don't want their files in the servers of some other company. Plus, you get as much cloud storage as you have storage on your computer. The is free to use for personal use. There are enterprise options for businesses as well.
Signing up for an individual account at Box gives you 10GB of cloud storage, which is a good start. Similar to Dropbox, Box natively allows its users to create text documents that can be edited in real time with collaborators. This cloud storage service also offers the ability to edit text as well as other types of documents with Microsoft’s Office tools integration, which are like Google’s suite of productivity apps, but more akin to the legacy desktop apps that some are accustomed to using.
Anyone can sign up for a free individual account on Box, but the service's endless list of sharing and privacy features were built specifically for business and IT users. Beyond the basic cloud storage setup, where you can store just about any kind of file, Box lets you share files with colleagues, assign tasks, leave comments on someone's work, and get notifications when a file changes.

It’s a good idea to look at what types of encryption (in-transit and at-rest are customary now) and authentication methods are offered, and it also wouldn’t hurt to look into the company’s history with handling user data. Also, it’s important to check whose handling your data. Some companies have their own data centers to store user data, while others toss information to third-parties. Because of this, we suggest rummaging the service level agreements to see where and how your data is being stored — your cloud company’s reputation might not be the only one you need to evaluate.

Cloud storage is a selective backup procedure where you choose which files to store online, and then you send them to your online account. When you delete a file on your computer that you backed up online, the file is still in your cloud storage account because it isn't actually tied to your computer anymore; it's just a single file that you uploaded online.
While remote file storage has been with us for decade — I had remote storage on a Unix server using file transfer protocol (ftp) and NFS (Network File System) in the 80s — cloud storage for the masses didn't really get going until 2007 when Drew Houston, Dropbox's CEO and founder, got sick and tired of never being able to "remember to keep my USB drive with me".

You’ll be taken to the Dropbox website, where you can add the email addresses of specific people you want to share the folder with. They’ll need a Dropbox account to access the folder. Once they’ve accepted, the folder will appear in every person’s Dropbox account and anyone can copy files to and remove file-s from the folder. It’s a great way to ensure you and a friend or colleague all have the same files. The files and any changes or removals will sync to each person’s PC automatically, just like any other Dropbox folder.
Even with the free additional storage, Dropbox isn't cheap if you need a lot of storage. On the other hand, it continues to be my favorite because it integrates so easily with every computing device I use. In addition, even if I don't have an internet connection, I can use any files stored in it because by default, it syncs with all my local devices. If it were only cheaper, it would be perfect.
There are several services to pick from, and some of them are pretty similar. While common at their core offerings (to give you copious amounts of space to store files online), only a few go beyond that by giving users more free storage upfront, useful online productivity tools, and the option to expand storage well above the 1TB mark. Here are the most popular services and how to determine which one is right for you.

While remote file storage has been with us for decade — I had remote storage on a Unix server using file transfer protocol (ftp) and NFS (Network File System) in the 80s — cloud storage for the masses didn't really get going until 2007 when Drew Houston, Dropbox's CEO and founder, got sick and tired of never being able to "remember to keep my USB drive with me".


Accidentally delete a file or save a new version of a file you’re not happy with? No problem. Dropbox stores copies of all deleted files and folders for 30 days—or as many as 120 days for Dropbox Business users—including previous versions of files, so you can easily recover them. We also provide confirmation warnings on the desktop when team members move or delete files. They’ll know what happens when they take action, and fewer files will be lost accidentally.
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