Microsoft doesn’t offer encryption services for personal OneDrive accounts; business and SharePoint online are the company’s only encrypted online storage platforms. This means if you want to use your own personal account through Microsoft’s cloud and not have to deal with potentially compromised information, you might have to encrypt your own data to ensure your files are secure. In addition, the company’s history of battling “privacy concerns” goes hand-in-hand with its reputation for tracking users without transparent disclosure.


Storing your most sensitive files locally on a hard drive is still (and probably always will be) the logical thing to do. But it’s not always the most convenient, which is why most of us look to cloud storage as a secondary option. It has its own set of benefits: it’s reasonably affordable, it makes sharing files easier, it’s ubiquitous across most operating systems and devices, and it’s just really nice to have a backup when your hard drive dies.
Microsoft’s OneDrive had an awkward youth, stumbling from Windows Live Folders, Windows Live SkyDrive, SkyDrive and now OneDrive. And it’s not quite as polished and easy to use as some competitors. For example, to share a file stored in OneDrive, you must go to the OneDrive website, while other services such as Dropbox let you share by right-clicking on a file on your hard drive. Nonetheless, OneDrive integrates nicely (no surprise) with Microsoft Office 365 and Microsoft’s mobile apps, and it offers real-time collaboration in Office documents. A free plan gives you 5GB of storage –  more than Dropbox but considerably less than Google Drive. Office 365 personal subscribers get 1TB or 5TB of included OneDrive storage, a nice bonus.
Amazon’s Unlimited Everything plan truly was unprecedented when the company announced it in 2015, and went unmatched ever since. For $60 per year, you could keep as much as you could muster in your own private Amazon cloud locker. The industry standard, then and now, is roughly $10 per month for 1TB of space. Which is to say, twice as much as Amazon’s offering had been, with a firm cap, instead of all-you-can-cloud.

Basic iCloud services are available via the web on any platform. To really use it to its full potential, you need to be running a Mac with Lion or above or an iPad, iPhone, or iPod touch running iOS 5 or better. It also runs reasonably well on Windows with the latest version of iTunes. What about your Mac running Snow Leopard or an older version of Mac OS X? You're out of luck.
With an Apple Music family plan, your family can enjoy unlimited access to Apple Music on their devices.1 Everyone gets full access to the Apple Music library, with over 50 million songs. And each family member gets a private account with a personal music library and expert recommendations. Start your free three-month trial2 and enjoy a whole world of music for the whole family.
If you don't mind going with Microsoft, then Microsoft OneDrive is a great value if you plan on paying. Signing up for an account is free, but it will only net you 5GB of space by default, just like Apple iCloud. However, if you go for at least 1TB with OneDrive, then it's the best bang for your buck. Here's the breakdown with Microsoft OneDrive pricing:
With these roles, nobody except the marketing analyst can view/download the objects that she adds to the bucket. She can, however, grant other users access by changing the object's ACLs. The IT staff can still list the contents of the finance-marketing bucket, and they can delete and overwrite the files that are stored in the bucket should the need arise.
Two of the oldest cloud storage file sharing platforms on the market nowadays are SugarSync and Box.com, both launched in 2005.  Followed by Google Docs in 2006 and OneDrive in 2007. Dropbox has reached an incredibly high number of users, 300 million since launch in 2007. Google Drive has 240 million users and according to Microsoft, OneDrive has more than 250 million users.  These applications have been highly adopted as they are very easy to use and accessible to anyone.  With most vendors leading with their ‘Freemium’ pricing strategy, by which a product or service is provided free of charge, it’s a no-brainer for anyone who is looking to implement and trial cloud storage for themselves.
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You are collaborating with another research center on sensitive data but they are on the other side of the world. Your organization has very strict usage guidelines around data sharing … and so does your collaborator. With Federated Cloud Sharing from ownCloud, both organizations can maintain their individual control while sharing designated files and folders across time zones and geographies – all while maintaining the access at any time, from any device.
Apple's iCloud service includes iCloud Photo Sharing, which lets you share images and video with friends, family, and colleagues on an iPhone, iPad, Mac, PC, or Apple TV. While technically considered part of iCloud Photo Library, iCloud Photo Sharing exists outside of the service: You don't have to use iCloud Photo Library to share your images, and shared albums don't count toward your iCloud storage.

European cloud storage company Tresorit gained recognition with its hacking contest a few years back, offering $50,000 to anyone who could hack into its servers. Tresorit claims no one succeeded. Clearly, the company is going after the security-conscious, promising end-to-end encrypted file sharing and syncing, HIPAA and GDPR compliance, the protection of Swiss privacy laws, and other security measures.


Our sourcing team and is scattered all over the world (Spain, China, Hong Kong, Colombia & Ecuador). Sharing real-time data is vital to our business and we were having all sorts of difficulties and delays sharing heavy files and artworks with our Chinese office and vendors. Nihao Cloud has been life changing! Their customer service is amazing. I'm not IT savvy and each time I've had an issue or question their Helpdesk has been able to solve it within minutes. Amazing! Highly recommend this service

Need big business cloud storage at small business-friendly prices? Zoolz gives small businesses access to powerful cloud storage without the sticker shock. Unlike its competitors, Zoolz comes with unlimited users and servers, making it easy to scale the service to your business's needs. There are also no caps on your upload/download bandwidth speeds or file sizes, so you don't have to worry about not being able to use the service when you need it most. Zoolz also offers "Tribrid" backup service which combines your local backup, their instant storage and cold storage.
You are collaborating with another research center on sensitive data but they are on the other side of the world. Your organization has very strict usage guidelines around data sharing … and so does your collaborator. With Federated Cloud Sharing from ownCloud, both organizations can maintain their individual control while sharing designated files and folders across time zones and geographies – all while maintaining the access at any time, from any device.
That sounds great, but it can actually be very confusing, even for dedicated Apple fans like Chris Maxcer of MacNewsWorld, who found that iCloud's constant syncing of files from all his devices with full read/write permissions and an inability to tell what was on the cloud and what wasn't, had him wanting to throw his "iPhone into the street", and then to run out in traffic so he could stomp it into oblivion. I feel his pain.
Quick take: If you’re an Amazon Prime member, you already have access to this free unlimited service. And unlike most free options, Amazon Photos has no size restrictions for images. For files larger than 2GB, though, you have to use the free Amazon Drive Desktop app instead of the Drive website to upload images. Like photo storage services from Apple and Google, Amazon Photos also features a mobile app, Prime Photos, which offers editing features, tagging, support for those “live” motion photos you see on smartphones, and machine-learning-supported search. That last perk uses artificial intelligence to recognize objects in your photos, which can help locate items in your collection. For instance, you can use search terms such as “tree,” “cat,” or “man” to find the photo you’re looking for. 

If you don't yet have a service for storing and syncing your data in the cloud, you should seriously consider one. Which you choose depends on the kinds of files you store, how much security you need, whether you plan to collaborate with other people, and which devices you use to edit and access your files. It may also depend on your comfort level with computers in general. Some services are extremely user-friendly, while others offer advanced customization for more experienced technophiles.
Choosing a cloud storage product for your organization can seem like a daunting task when you first consider all of the variables involved. Striking a balance between usability, security, and customization ultimately needs to be driven by business requirements, but understanding exactly what those requirements are is a serious task that will require real work; it's not something you want to come to with a snap decision. Planning is the key. So sit down with business leads, IT managers, and even a rep from the cloud provider under consideration. Make sure that all parties are getting what they need. Only after going through that step should you pull the trigger on a provider and start the migration process.
Comedian George Carlin has a routine in which he talks about how humans seem to spend their lives accumulating "stuff." Once they've gathered enough stuff, they have to find places to store all of it. If Carlin were to update that routine today, he could make the same observation about computer information. It seems that everyone with a computer spends a lot of time acquiring data and then trying to find a way to store it.
^ Kolodner, Elliot K.; Tal, Sivan; Kyriazis, Dimosthenis; Naor, Dalit; Allalouf, Miriam; Bonelli, Lucia; Brand, Per; Eckert, Albert; Elmroth, Erik; Gogouvitis, Spyridon V.; Harnik, Danny; Hernandez, Francisco; Jaeger, Michael C.; Bayuh Lakew, Ewnetu; Manuel Lopez, Jose; Lorenz, Mirko; Messina, Alberto; Shulman-Peleg, Alexandra; Talyansky, Roman; Voulodimos, Athanasios; Wolfsthal, Yaron (2011). "A Cloud Environment for Data-intensive Storage Services". 2011 IEEE Third International Conference on Cloud Computing Technology and Science. doi:10.1109/CloudCom.2011.55.
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