Microsoft doesn’t offer encryption services for personal OneDrive accounts; business and SharePoint online are the company’s only encrypted online storage platforms. This means if you want to use your own personal account through Microsoft’s cloud and not have to deal with potentially compromised information, you might have to encrypt your own data to ensure your files are secure. In addition, the company’s history of battling “privacy concerns” goes hand-in-hand with its reputation for tracking users without transparent disclosure.

With the 6TB Microsoft OneDrive plan, that is a total of 6TB split up among 6 users, so 1TB each. You can share your total storage and have certain accounts with more than 1TB by sharing folders and adding shared folders to your own OneDrive. So while the 6TB option is still a pretty good value, you'll need to do a bit of folder juggling if you don't want to use six accounts.
iCloud Drive is starting to get some of the great collaboration features that rivals including Dropbox offer. However, it still lacks selective sync, which is a deal-breaker for some. If you're an Apple user and are willing to pay at least 79p per month for the privilege then it's well worth taking advantage of iCloud Drive, but for those using other operating systems we'd suggest looking elsewhere.
Amazon’s Unlimited Everything plan truly was unprecedented when the company announced it in 2015, and went unmatched ever since. For $60 per year, you could keep as much as you could muster in your own private Amazon cloud locker. The industry standard, then and now, is roughly $10 per month for 1TB of space. Which is to say, twice as much as Amazon’s offering had been, with a firm cap, instead of all-you-can-cloud.
The best solution is one that empowers users to share their content easily with others within their organization, and to invite external users to participate, while also giving the IT administrators full visibility and ultimate authority over security of the content. Hosting the files on-premises rather than in the cloud removes risk and leverages the existing corporate infrastructure security investment. The solution retains the "feel" of the cloud as end users share and access files via a web browser, preserving the fast, easy workflows of cloud sharing.
By sharing storage and networks with many other users/customers it is possible for other customers to access your data. Sometimes because of erroneous actions, faulty equipment, a bug and sometimes because of criminal intent. This risk applies to all types of storage and not only cloud storage. The risk of having data read during transmission can be mitigated through encryption technology. Encryption in transit protects data as it is being transmitted to and from the cloud service.[19] Encryption at rest protects data that is stored at the service provider. Encrypting data in an on-premises cloud service on-ramp system can provide both kinds of encryption protection.
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Keep your password secure. Change your password regularly and don't use the same password across multiple websites. If hackers crack one password it's a pain, but if they access all your online accounts it can be a nightmare. As many sites use your email as a login ID, using the same password increases your security risk (see 60 seconds on password security for more info).
You could also just pass files back and forth via a service like MASV, if you’re sending archives of drafts and finished work to one another. It’s less useful if each client just wants to have a folder they can reference that’s full of everything you’ve worked on together: old and new projects, invoices, artwork, documents, spreadsheets, et cetera. Similarly, there’s Hightail—also worth considering, with the same kind of limitations.
Some of the largest and most valuable companies in the world have created applications in record time by leveraging the flexibility, performance, and low cost of cloud storage. Even the simplest static websites can be improved for an amazingly low cost. Developers all over the world are turning to pay-as-you go storage options that remove management and scale headaches.
SugarSync has a slightly confusing usage model. Unlike, say, Dropbox, you can designate any file folders on your hard drive to be synced to the cloud; you don’t need to keep everything in a designated folder. To sync folders, you right-click them (after installing the SugarSync desktop client). But just in case you want a designated folder, the service automatically creates a syncing folder on your computer called My SugarSync (formerly Magic Briefcase). As of now, there are no collaborative editing tools – or even two-factor authentication, either of which could be a deal breaker for business users. Also worth noting: Aside from a free 5GB trial (good for 90 days), there’s no free plan.

Locking data away doesn't end with just passwords, either. In addition to having something you know, it's better to pair it with something you have. Two-factor or even multifactor authentication (MFA) is becoming a more commonplace option, and cloud storage companies are getting onboard. Mobile phones, or specially prepared USB fobs, are typically the default option as the secondary authentication source. But other forms of tokens exist, including smart cards and biometrics.
Microsoft OneDrive integrates with Office Online which you can use to collaborate with others no matter the plan you subscribe to. If you want to take notes and share them you can use OneNote. To communicate with others, there’s Skype which is integrated with the web client. Productivity apps include Forms for workflow management and Sway for content publishing.
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