Quick take: This service lets you upload as many photos (though just photos) as you want. However, Sony downsizes the images to about 3-megapixels, which roughly translates to a 6x5-inch print at 300 dpi. There’s no paid storage option. It may not be an ideal solution, but because it’s free, the service can serve as a smart secondary or tertiary backup plan because it allows for automatic photo uploads through your smartphone.
Dropbox gives its users plenty of opportunities to get extra storage to beef up the paltry 2GB you get when you sign up. If you participate in the quick Getting Started tutorial, you get 250MB. Turn on the automatic photo upload feature on any of the mobile apps to get 3GB of extra space (you can get only 3GB total, not per device). You can earn 500MB for each friend you refer to Dropbox who actually signs up for the service, up to 16GB total, or 32 referrals.

Keeping data safe is a bigger challenge today than it's ever been. What were once considered "advanced" data safety features, such as enterprise-grade identity management, redundant storage layers, and encryption both at rest and in transit, are no longer optional. These are now basic requirements for you to even consider spending money on a service. Fortunately, cloud storage providers seem to agree, which is evidenced by commonly available features and the fact that most IT professionals trust cloud security as much or more than what's available on-premises (64 percent according to a 2015 survey by the Cloud Security Alliance). The logic is fairly simple. Most IT professionals simply don't have the budget to research, deploy, and manage the advanced security capabilities that cloud service vendors can provide because it's key to their primary business. That's upped security in the cloud significantly over the past couple of years, which has had the pleasant side effect of letting many cloud services successfully comply with standards such as the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and ISO 27001.
The range of capabilities of cloud-based storage services is incredible. Many of them specialize in a specific area. For example, Dropbox and SugarSync focus on keeping a synced folder accessible everywhere. SpiderOak emphasizes security. Some cloud storage services, such as Apple iCloud, Google Drive and Microsoft OneDrive, are generalists, offering not only folder and file syncing, but also media-playing and device syncing. These products even double as collaboration software, offering real-time document coediting.
Google Drive offers plenty of plans to choose from. The free one gives you a whopping 15GB of storage and makes it fit for our list of the best free cloud storage offers. The paid plans start at 100GB and end at 30TB, but most aren’t good value. The 1TB plan costs $9.99 per month, which is the best one among them, but it’s still not close to, say, pCloud.
Google Drive offers centralized storage for any type of file. It offers 15GB of free storage for three Google products: Photos, Gmail, and Drive. Paid plans include (a) $1.99 per month for 100GB of storage, (b) $10 per month for 1TB, and (c) a data-storage plan of $100 per month for 100TB. Google is upgrading the data service to a new product called Google One. It will offer storage as well as access to Google experts.
You can store any kind of file in Dropbox, by either uploading to the website or adding it with the desktop apps. Those apps live in your file system so that you can easily move files from your computer to the cloud and vice versa by dragging and dropping them into your Dropbox folder. The service automatically and quickly syncs your files across all of your devices, so you can access everything, everywhere. There is no size limit on files you upload to Dropbox with the desktop or mobile apps, but larger files can take several hours to upload, depending on your connection speed.
Upthere Home is one of the newer cloud storage apps on mobile. It's by Western Digital, the hard drive manufacturer. It works similarly to Google Photos rather than other types of cloud storage. It features automatic uploads of photos and videos with a UI centered around viewing such content. However, it does support other file types as well. This one also has simple pricing. The app features a single pricing option at $1.99 for 100GB of storage. It's simple, it works okay, and it's cheap. That may be good enough for many. Western Digital also has a My Cloud app that works with most of their hard drives. It's another decent option for home-made cloud storage.
One adult in your household — the organizer — chooses the features your family will share and invites up to five family members to join. Your family can share iTunes, Apple Books, and App Store purchases, an Apple Music family subscription, a single iCloud storage plan, and more. Once family members join, Family Sharing is set up on everyone’s devices automatically.
You can access your cloud files through an app or software installed on your computer (once it's installed, it's usually pretty much invisible), though you need an internet connection for it to work. If you temporarily don't have an internet connection, that's okay. The service waits until the next time you do have a connection and takes care of business then.
Some cloud storage services offer pretty healthy free storage plans for individual users, which becomes a good way to start things off. Then there are others that offer superb deals of free storage bundled with devices from manufacturers like Apple and HP. The thumb rule is – cloud vendors don’t get hurt by giving away free storage, if it gets them new clients for premium services. Look for it and you shall find it.
If you already have a Google account, you can already access Google Drive. You just have to head to drive.google.com and enable the service. You get 15GB of storage for anything you upload to Drive, including photos, videos, documents, Photoshop files and more. However, you have to share that 15GB with your Gmail account, photos you upload to Google+, and any documents you create in Google Drive.
To start, while a big space for data is great, for information to be useful in the business world, it also needs to be accessible, traceable, and secure. This means cloud services also should support the needs of workers accessing data in multiple locations, since roughly 50 percent of the US workforce is set up for at least part-time remote work, according to GlobalWorkplaceAnalytics.com. In addition, cloud services should support the workflow of your organization. Luckily, there are several cloud storage applications that can meet these challenges. But before you make a final buying decision and migrate your data to someone else's cloud, you should know some key details relating to storage and sharing, security, and integrations.

One of the reasons that Tresorit is so secure comes down to the way files are encrypted. With a local client installed on either your Windows or mac OS machine your data is encrypted locally, then sent to the Tresorit servers where it remains encrypted. You retain the decryption keys (not that you’ll ever see them) and not even the staff at Tresorit can access your files, thanks to their Zero-Knowledge policy.


So after sizing up the actual needs and priorities of your company, choose a secure solution for your data handling needs that also fits your budget and is aimed at enterprise data management and not limited to one department. The price of effective data management will be cheaper than the alternative – the cost of losing productivity, data, and security.
iCloud Drive is starting to get some of the great collaboration features that rivals including Dropbox offer. However, it still lacks selective sync, which is a deal-breaker for some. If you're an Apple user and are willing to pay at least 79p per month for the privilege then it's well worth taking advantage of iCloud Drive, but for those using other operating systems we'd suggest looking elsewhere.
Mega is the sequel to the now-defunct Megaupload, a cloud storage service that was taken down by the authorities a couple of years ago. Mega is an up-and-coming service that gives users 50GB for free. That's the largest sign-on bonus we've seen among all of these cloud storage apps and services. It comes with a range of storage options that span from 200GB to 8TB. The app is quite flashy but there are a few bugs here and there that some people have experienced. Its biggest feature is that it encrypts all files uploaded to it for added security and protection.

It’s a good idea to look at what types of encryption (in-transit and at-rest are customary now) and authentication methods are offered, and it also wouldn’t hurt to look into the company’s history with handling user data. Also, it’s important to check whose handling your data. Some companies have their own data centers to store user data, while others toss information to third-parties. Because of this, we suggest rummaging the service level agreements to see where and how your data is being stored — your cloud company’s reputation might not be the only one you need to evaluate.
For instance, Amazon offers 100GB for $12 per year. That’s double the storage space available from Apple’s iCloud for the same price. However, if you own a MacBook, an iPad, or an iPhone, you may prefer to remain within the Apple ecosystem for access to apps such as Pages or Sheets. The same holds true for fans of the Microsoft and Google ecosystems. In the end, paying a bit of a premium might be worth it to keep things simple.
Mobile compatibility has gained a place in the ecosystem of business. This especially applies to road warriors who frequently work in planes, cars, and subways. Space is often at a premium, and the ability to prepare for a meeting or analyze a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet on the go is a necessity. Having a cloud storage solution that can provide these capabilities to users via a software client optimized for their particular operating system (OS), be it Android, iOS, even Windows Phone, is a feature you should look for in a competitive service offering. For example, Dropbox Business recently added some new mobile features on iOS that let users see file activity and team feedback in file preview.
In terms of storage capacity, raw storage space is becoming more and more affordable every year. As multiple terabytes (TB) per user become commonplace, competition has shifted more to service features rather than overall bucket size. Today, 1 TB of space is typical as a starting place, with more storage readily available and very affordable. What you're really looking at are the other features provided by the service.
In addition, iCloud Drive, in my experience, is prone to be slow and quirky. I've had trouble syncing files between my Macs and iDevices. Eventually, I think iCloud Drive will be for Apple users what OneDrive already is for Windows, but it's still having teething problems. However, as a business solution? It's not there now, and I doubt it ever will be.
Like the other services, you can use your files via Box's website and even create basic text documents. To make it shine, you'll need the Box Sync and Edit apps for Windows or Mac OS X. It also comes with Android, iOS, and Windows Phone apps that will enable you to view, upload and share files. Box is also now integrated directly with Google's Chrome OS or Chromebooks users.
ADrive delivers businesses and enterprise-level online cloud storage services. It gives users the ability to edit documents online, maintain multiuser accounts and engage in multiple concurrent sessions. The business plan starts with 200 GB of storage capacity, Additional services include online collaboration, remote file transfer and 24/7 technical support. Features also include increased security and file history recovery. ADrive offers both personal and business plans.  www.adrive.com
One of the reasons that Tresorit is so secure comes down to the way files are encrypted. With a local client installed on either your Windows or mac OS machine your data is encrypted locally, then sent to the Tresorit servers where it remains encrypted. You retain the decryption keys (not that you’ll ever see them) and not even the staff at Tresorit can access your files, thanks to their Zero-Knowledge policy.
EBS is designed for workloads that require persistent storage accessible by single EC2 instances. Typical use cases include relational and NoSQL databases (like Microsoft SQL Server and MySQL or Cassandra and MongoDB), Big Data analytics engines (like the Hadoop/HDFS ecosystem and Amazon EMR), stream and log processing applications (like Kafka and Splunk), and data warehousing applications (like Vertica and Teradata).
ShareFile, which Citrix acquired in 2011, creates a custom file-sharing site for your business, so you can share files easily with clients, partners, co-workers and others. The service offers numerous compelling features and tools for business users, including workflow management, document collaboration, e-signatures and integration with Microsoft Outlook and Gmail. Security is robust, too, with up to 256-bit AES encryption and customizable permissions settings.
Backblaze is a simple to use and affordable cloud storage platform for general use. Its B2 Cloud Storage can be used for storage, file sharing, hosting or large-scale backup. This software is optimized for Mac systems and integrates with OS to allow you to seamlessly backup and restore your system in the event of data loss or a complete system loss. You can return your computers to the state they were in 30 days prior, which is useful for deterring ransomware or other malware.
A reputable cloud storage service protects the files behind encryption and requires you to enter a password in order to be able to access the files. Most of the time, the cloud storage account can be protected behind two-factor authentication, too, so that anyone wanting access to your files has to know not only the password but another code sent to your phone upon the login request.
Like its competitors, OneDrive offers an automatic photo-backup feature — and it’s actually pretty great. The Photo menu does a good job of automatically grouping your image files according to some predefined tags. For example, one of our testers went pond fishing this past spring, and the pictures of him in a boat were tagged “#Outdoor” and the landscape photos of the lake were tagged “#Waterfront.” OneDrive’s browser client even lets you ship image files directly to the nearest Walgreens for prints when you want them.

With an Apple Music family plan, your family can enjoy unlimited access to Apple Music on their devices.1 Everyone gets full access to the Apple Music library, with over 50 million songs. And each family member gets a private account with a personal music library and expert recommendations. Start your free three-month trial2 and enjoy a whole world of music for the whole family.


Annoyingly, to get your 3GB of free storage space you have to try out a free trial of the 'Premium' package which costs £8/US$10.42 per month. This doesn't mean you have to pay, as you can choose to revert to the Basic account, but we don't like this mechanism and it stands out when compared to almost every other cloud storage service we've tested.

Google also recently introduced Google Photos, an online photo locker, where you can organize photos into albums. Google Photos is built into Drive in a separate tab, but you're really better off going straight to googlephotos.com to see and organize photos. However, you don't need to download the Google Photos app on your phone or tablet to back pictures you take there. The Google Drive app can take care of that.


To access files and folder shared with you, you have to head to the OneDrive website or mobile app and look in the Shared section. Files and folders shared with you won’t be synced to your desktop, so you’ll need to use your browser to download such files and upload files to shared folders. As with Google Drive, Office Online also allows you to edit documents with other people in real-time.
Annoyingly, to get your 3GB of free storage space you have to try out a free trial of the 'Premium' package which costs £8/US$10.42 per month. This doesn't mean you have to pay, as you can choose to revert to the Basic account, but we don't like this mechanism and it stands out when compared to almost every other cloud storage service we've tested.
We’d say Dropbox is foremost a functional solution – every second person has used it before, and has an individual version installed on their device. Discovering the outstanding syncing power of the system, the plethora of smooth integrations, sharing features, and dedicated support that are missing in the free package will convince you the Dropbox Business is probably one of the best transfer systems businesses out there can purchase. We recommend it especially because of its version history and unlimited recovery, priority emails, and remote account transfer.
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The second element of the service is the Briefcase, which is a general online storage facility not linked to a specific PC. Here, via the web portal or your computer, you can upload and download files just as you would on Dropbox or OneDrive. These files can be accessed via your PC, phone or tablet, with apps being available for iOS, Android, and Windows Phone.
Does your business specialize in managing datacenters to enable remote access and secure file sharing? Do you have thousands of dollars in upfront capital to spend every time you need to upgrade your servers, only to have to spend that money again if something goes wrong? By using cloud storage, you trust the experts to manage the nitty gritty details of how to store and protect your files so you can focus on the things your business does well. Let cloud storage save your business money and keep the distractions to a minimum.
The TLS protocol prevents man-in-the-middle attacks from succeeding, while encryption secures your data in transit and at rest. Private encryption prevents anyone other than you from reading your files. The drawback is that services which provide it won’t be able to reset your password if you forget it. To avoid losing access to your content use a password manager.
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