Dropbox business the upload/download speeds were 1/10th our bandwidth (we have 600mbps download and got 60, and 250mbps upload and got 20mbps on Dropbox – not a big deal for personal users with more typical Internet speeds.) The deal breaker was that we couldn’t embed a file folder listing inside our client dashboard web page like we could with Google Drive.

“Being a small business owner, I run into the issue all the time of clients and their cloud storage systems. Google Drive, Dropbox, Box, etc. It creates quite the headache to be able to find everything, and it also becomes pretty expensive to maintain a subscription to all of these different platforms. How would you suggest consolidating everything into one main platform, while still making it convenient for my clients?”

A reputable cloud storage service protects the files behind encryption and requires you to enter a password in order to be able to access the files. Most of the time, the cloud storage account can be protected behind two-factor authentication, too, so that anyone wanting access to your files has to know not only the password but another code sent to your phone upon the login request.
Upthere Home is one of the newer cloud storage apps on mobile. It's by Western Digital, the hard drive manufacturer. It works similarly to Google Photos rather than other types of cloud storage. It features automatic uploads of photos and videos with a UI centered around viewing such content. However, it does support other file types as well. This one also has simple pricing. The app features a single pricing option at $1.99 for 100GB of storage. It's simple, it works okay, and it's cheap. That may be good enough for many. Western Digital also has a My Cloud app that works with most of their hard drives. It's another decent option for home-made cloud storage.
Ensuring that information is auditable is paramount to meeting corporate obligations. Losing mission-critical files due to mistakes or misconduct can often cost hundreds of thousands or even millions of dollars in reparations or lost capital. Document retention is often a requirement in legal matters as well. In heavily regulated industries, having the right information on hand can often mean the difference between being in or out of compliance with federal or industry-specific regulations. All of this means that, before you purchase any cloud service, you need to sit down with your IT staff and your compliance expert, and then map out exactly where data and apps need to be located in order to pass the compliance regulations that are important to your business.
Cloud storage is a model of computer data storage in which the digital data is stored in logical pools. The physical storage spans multiple servers (sometimes in multiple locations), and the physical environment is typically owned and managed by a hosting company. These cloud storage providers are responsible for keeping the data available and accessible, and the physical environment protected and running. People and organizations buy or lease storage capacity from the providers to store user, organization, or application data.
IT can’t ignore Apple iCloud. This personal cloud storage service, which debuted in iOS 5 and will also have an expanded presence in Mac OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion, backs up media and documents that users download and create, which is great for personal use. Despite some enterprise IT fears about iCloud, there might be a silver lining: iTunes is the portal through which files get to iCloud, and since iTunes has to run on a computer, a system administrator can use system policies to restrict users’ access.
One adult in your household — the organizer — chooses the features your family will share and invites up to five family members to join. Your family can share iTunes, Apple Books, and App Store purchases, an Apple Music family subscription, a single iCloud storage plan, and more. Once family members join, Family Sharing is set up on everyone’s devices automatically.
Michael Muchmore is PC Magazine's lead analyst for software and web applications. A native New Yorker, he has at various times headed up PC Magazine's coverage of Web development, enterprise software, and display technologies. Michael cowrote one of the first overviews of web services for a general audience. Before that he worked on PC Magazine's S... See Full Bio
AWS Backup is a fully managed backup service that makes it easy to centralize and automate the back up of data across AWS services in the cloud as well as on premises using the AWS Storage Gateway. Using AWS Backup, you can centrally configure backup policies and monitor backup activity for AWS resources, such as Amazon EBS volumes, Amazon RDS databases, Amazon DynamoDB tables, Amazon EFS file systems, and AWS Storage Gateway volumes.

This cloud data protection service features enterprise-level backup features, including large storage capacities, advanced retention policies and bare metal recovery. Storage Guardian supports hybrid systems for faster recovery in the event of an internet outage. It can also backup virtual machines and several other cloud storage and file sharing platforms, including Microsoft Office 365 and Google Drive.
Data security is a growing concern, and no small matter. A recent study by the Ponemon Institute found that the average consolidated total cost of a data breach is $3.8 million. That number can represent the cost of lost business opportunities and patents, decreased customer trust, and a need for reputation management for your business. ShareFile cloud storage can improve the integrity of your data security by ensuring that all your important files are protected by our world-class SSAE 16 Type II accredited datacenters with up to 256-bit encryption.
In this scenario, a company's marketing analyst wants to use Cloud Storage to back up confidential revenue forecasts and sales projection data. The data must be accessible only by the marketing analyst. The company's IT department oversees and manages the company's Cloud Storage account. Their primary management responsibilities include creating and sharing buckets so that various departments throughout the company have access to Cloud Storage.
Cloud storage is a selective backup procedure where you choose which files to store online, and then you send them to your online account. When you delete a file on your computer that you backed up online, the file is still in your cloud storage account because it isn't actually tied to your computer anymore; it's just a single file that you uploaded online.

Box.com is an up and comer in the cloud storage world. There are a variety of file management apps and others that have Box integration as well and that's nice. New users can sign up for personal accounts for free and get 10GB of free storage while $10/month gets you 100GB. Business prices range from $5-$15/month per user and include far more features. The app works pretty well and it puts an emphasis on simplicity and organization. Unfortunately, those who need more than 100GB may need to shop elsewhere.

Recovery of lost files. If a file is corrupted or lost, there is no need to panic when using the cloud. Cloud computing providers are able to resolve issues with damaged or lost files that have been shared, which not only saves you from panicking, but it also saves a lot of time (just another way that time can be saved by sharing files via the cloud.)
Hightail plays well with other file sharing services, too. You can drag and drop files into a Space from your computer, Dropbox, Google Drive and OneDrive. Hightail is versatile, with third-party app integration, apps for iOS and Android, and macOS and Windows apps, with automatic desktop folder syncing. There are two different types of plans: file sharing and creative collaboration, which includes file sharing and additional features with plans starting at $125/month.
Does your business specialize in managing datacenters to enable remote access and secure file sharing? Do you have thousands of dollars in upfront capital to spend every time you need to upgrade your servers, only to have to spend that money again if something goes wrong? By using cloud storage, you trust the experts to manage the nitty gritty details of how to store and protect your files so you can focus on the things your business does well. Let cloud storage save your business money and keep the distractions to a minimum.
MediaFire is a lesser-known file sharing/storage service, but with a free plan offering 10GB of storage, it’s worth considering. The free service lets you upload files up to 4GB in size, and uploads are scanned with the BitDefender antivirus engine. You can share file links on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest, Tumblr, and Blogger and generate a one-time download link. MediaFire is easy to use, too, with an intuitive interface.
For this reason, many organizations are exploring cloud storage solutions, which provide the storage capacity they need without making any up-front capital investments. Cloud storage can help simplify data sharing among managers, peers and clients, and the platforms listed here also offer additional benefits including collaboration and workflow, plus integration with enterprise software programs. With cloud storage, organizations can ensure 24/7 availability of data and reduce downtime and management efforts. Additionally, the ability to set different access levels for file sharing helps ensure the privacy and security of sensitive information.
Storing your files in the cloud has many advantages. You can view your files from any phone, tablet or computer that's connected to the Internet, and the cloud can also provide backup for files so they'll never disappear if your phone gets lost or your computer crashes. Using the cloud is a no-brainer, but picking which service to use is a bit more difficult.
Amazon’s Unlimited Everything plan truly was unprecedented when the company announced it in 2015, and went unmatched ever since. For $60 per year, you could keep as much as you could muster in your own private Amazon cloud locker. The industry standard, then and now, is roughly $10 per month for 1TB of space. Which is to say, twice as much as Amazon’s offering had been, with a firm cap, instead of all-you-can-cloud.
In this scenario, a construction company works with several architectural design firms that deliver building plans for various projects. The construction company wants to set up a drop box for the vendor firms so they can upload architectural plans at various project milestones. The drop box must ensure the privacy of the construction company's clients, which means the drop box cannot allow the vendors to see each other's work. To accomplish this, you create a separate bucket for each architectural firm and grant the following roles for the listed resources to the specified members:
Box.com is an up and comer in the cloud storage world. There are a variety of file management apps and others that have Box integration as well and that's nice. New users can sign up for personal accounts for free and get 10GB of free storage while $10/month gets you 100GB. Business prices range from $5-$15/month per user and include far more features. The app works pretty well and it puts an emphasis on simplicity and organization. Unfortunately, those who need more than 100GB may need to shop elsewhere.

Best of all, creating shared albums is simpler than uploading images to Facebook or Instagram, and safer, too: Your images and video stay private between your group, and you can take the album down at any time. If you want to reach a wider range of people, you can even create a public iCloud.com website to host your images for anyone with the link to view them.
Google also recently introduced Google Photos, an online photo locker, where you can organize photos into albums. Google Photos is built into Drive in a separate tab, but you're really better off going straight to googlephotos.com to see and organize photos. However, you don't need to download the Google Photos app on your phone or tablet to back pictures you take there. The Google Drive app can take care of that.
Features: Knowing what features your cloud storage service supports is essential in choosing the right one for you. A comparison of the top free cloud storage services can help you decide between a few of the better ones. Beyond that, do some research on the company's websites to see what they offer, like if they support streaming media files from their website or mobile app, if that's something you require.

Who doesn't use Dropbox? Sure, its free storage is only 2GB, but you can use it on any platform. You can get to your files from Dropbox's website, desktop applications for Mac, Windows, and Linux, their native files systems, and the iOS, Android, BlackBerry, and Kindle Fire mobile apps. It's a snap to set up, and you don't need to worry about syncing files for a second.

Dropbox gives its users plenty of opportunities to get extra storage to beef up the paltry 2GB you get when you sign up. If you participate in the quick Getting Started tutorial, you get 250MB. Turn on the automatic photo upload feature on any of the mobile apps to get 3GB of extra space (you can get only 3GB total, not per device). You can earn 500MB for each friend you refer to Dropbox who actually signs up for the service, up to 16GB total, or 32 referrals.


Cloud storage is a model of computer data storage in which the digital data is stored in logical pools. The physical storage spans multiple servers (sometimes in multiple locations), and the physical environment is typically owned and managed by a hosting company. These cloud storage providers are responsible for keeping the data available and accessible, and the physical environment protected and running. People and organizations buy or lease storage capacity from the providers to store user, organization, or application data.
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