Tresorit is one of the newer and more expensive cloud storage options. However, it takes security very seriously. It features end-to-end encryption of every file uploaded to its service. Basic accounts get 1GB of storage. $12.50 per month earns you 200GB while $30 per month nets you 2TB. Additionally, the pro plans include far more security features than the free account. There are also additional options for businesses and enterprise use. It's a strong option for those who don't mind paying for it.

For people who need big-business cloud storage on a small-business budget, Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3) offers advanced features with web-scale computing capabilities at an affordable price. Small businesses get access to the same cloud used by Amazon and its big-name customers, such as Netflix, Pinterest and NASDAQ – a highly scalable infrastructure that comes with the same security, reliability and speed that the company offers to its big customers. Businesses can store and distribute documents, media, applications and other types of files; implement backup, archiving and disaster-recovery systems; and host their website on Amazon's servers.
Enter BOX. The speeds were about twice as fast as Dropbox (this is web browser upload/download operations – not background sync which you can’t tell the speeds very well anyway since it’s background – but sometimes we have tight deadlines with huge amounts of data to share.) And there’s an embed widget generator that works great. The number of setting is insance giving you granular control over many aspects of how your account is setup. Plus you get unlimited storage. Our opinion in the end was that BOX was far superior to both Google Drive and Dropbox.
Like its competitors, OneDrive offers an automatic photo-backup feature — and it’s actually pretty great. The Photo menu does a good job of automatically grouping your image files according to some predefined tags. For example, one of our testers went pond fishing this past spring, and the pictures of him in a boat were tagged “#Outdoor” and the landscape photos of the lake were tagged “#Waterfront.” OneDrive’s browser client even lets you ship image files directly to the nearest Walgreens for prints when you want them.
Details: Amazon Web Service’s business-oriented cloud storage service named Simple Storage Service (S3) has a tier of up to 5GB of free storage. On the consumer side, Amazon Prime members get free unlimited cloud storage for photos in Amazon Cloud Drive with their subscription, which costs $99 per year and includes free two-day shipping on eligible Amazon.com products. For non Amazon-prime members, unlimited photos can be stored for $11.99 per year after a three-month free trial. For $59.99 per year Amazon offers an “Unlimited Everything” plan, which allows any file or document to be stored.
Almost as important as keeping information safe is making information accessible across the diverse landscape of devices that users bring to the mix. The primary candidates are the typical: Microsoft Windows, Linux, and a variety of Android flavors, as well as Apple's iOS and OS X. For any platform to be effective in today's business landscape, web access is a must. In some cases, an authorized device is not always available. Being able to grab a quick document for a meeting or push a business-critical document from a remote computer can be a lifesaver for an ever-increasing distributed workforce—a lifesaver that users expect to be available to them.

To share the file with specific people, add their email addresses at the bottom. They’ll receive an invitation to access the file. You can set sharing settings to choose who can edit or just view the file — unlike in Dropbox, which requires a paid account to do this. If you share Google Docs files in this way, you and other people can edit them in real-time.


Sharing is easy with other members of Mega, behaving in much the same way as Google Drive and OneDrive, by allowing you to send an invitation to a friend and set the level of actions they can complete (view, edit, etc.) You can also send links to non-Mega users, but this involves also privately sending them an encryption key so they can access the files.
Public Cloud computing, commonly referred to as “the cloud” is a type of computing that involves storing, sharing and accessing data, programs and files over the Internet, as opposed to storing, accessing and sharing data, files and programs on your hard drive. The cloud has proven to be very beneficial for small business owners and the average Joe alike.
ZumoDrive works with Windows, Mac, Linux, iPhone, Android, and Palm Pre and seems to be making a lot of people happy. Designed to give you access to all your files — music, documents, videos, photos, and more — wherever you are and no matter what device or platform you're using, ZumoDrive's tag line is "cloud storage that appears local." ZumoDrive gives you 1GB of free storage. You can also choose a for-fee subscription plan that works for you —ranging from 10GB for $2.99/month all the way up to 500GB for $79.99/month.
Many cloud storage services have a free account that usually comes with some limitations, such as the amount of storage they provide or a size limit on files you can upload. We prefer services that offer some level of free service (even if it's only 2GB) rather than a time-based trial, because that lets you fully integrate a service into your life for several weeks while you get a feel for how it works and what might go wrong with your particular setup.
Sharing and content control features work well, too. You can share folders and specific files via links. pCloud lets you share folders by inviting others and granting “can edit” or “can view” permissions. Alternatively, you can generate an upload link which others can use to upload directly to your folder or a download link that enables them to download your files.
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