Apple iCloud is a cloud-based file-syncing and storage solution that enables users to store files in the cloud. The stored files are automatically synced to all devices in the account including both Windows and Mac PCs. The service comes with offerings such as the iCloud Photo Library and iCloud Drive, where you can keep all your files stored securely and updated everywhere. The Family Sharing feature lets you easily photos, movies, music and more with your family members. Find My iPhone helps you find your Apple device if you lose it.
One of the reasons that Tresorit is so secure comes down to the way files are encrypted. With a local client installed on either your Windows or mac OS machine your data is encrypted locally, then sent to the Tresorit servers where it remains encrypted. You retain the decryption keys (not that you’ll ever see them) and not even the staff at Tresorit can access your files, thanks to their Zero-Knowledge policy.
If you don't yet have a service for storing and syncing your data in the cloud, you should seriously consider one. Which you choose depends on the kinds of files you store, how much security you need, whether you plan to collaborate with other people, and which devices you use to edit and access your files. It may also depend on your comfort level with computers in general. Some services are extremely user-friendly, while others offer advanced customization for more experienced technophiles.

Its sharing capabilities don’t lack, either. You can share content with specific individuals via email or by generating a link and copying and pasting it. You can share a folder by generating a link or inviting users via email. If you use an email to share a folder, the recipients will need to register for a Tresorit account. Files can only be shared with a link and don’t have that requirement.
IDrive offers storage plans for individuals and businesses, which range from free to $74.62 per year. Not only can this service back up your computer, it also boasts extensive file-sharing and syncing capabilities. Specific features include the ability to share files and folders via email, Facebook and Twitter, mobile access, remote management tools and online file syncing. It can also back up multiple devices and back up files in real time. The service is highly secure as it transfers and stores files with 256-bit AES encryption using a user-defined key that is not stored anywhere on the servers. 
FinancesOnline is available for free for all our business professionals interested in an efficient way to find top-notch SaaS solutions. We are able to keep our service free of charge thanks to cooperation with some of the vendors, who are willing to pay us for traffic and sales opportunities provided by our website. Please note, that FinancesOnline lists all vendors, we’re not limited only to the ones that pay us, and all software providers have an equal opportunity to get featured in our rankings and comparisons, win awards, gather user reviews, all in our effort to give you reliable advice that will enable you to make well-informed purchase decisions.
There are many other reasons to pay for cloud storage, from getting a lot more space (a terabyte really doesn't cost all that much anymore) to being able to upload really big files. That last benefit is relevant to graphic designers, video editors, and other visual artists who often host enormous files. Other perks of paying for your cloud storage often include increased access to file-version history (meaning you can restore an important business proposal to the version you had before your colleague made a bunch of erroneous changes), more security, or more features for collaboration and working with teams.

It’s a good idea to look at what types of encryption (in-transit and at-rest are customary now) and authentication methods are offered, and it also wouldn’t hurt to look into the company’s history with handling user data. Also, it’s important to check whose handling your data. Some companies have their own data centers to store user data, while others toss information to third-parties. Because of this, we suggest rummaging the service level agreements to see where and how your data is being stored — your cloud company’s reputation might not be the only one you need to evaluate.

In this scenario, a construction company works with several architectural design firms that deliver building plans for various projects. The construction company wants to set up a drop box for the vendor firms so they can upload architectural plans at various project milestones. The drop box must ensure the privacy of the construction company's clients, which means the drop box cannot allow the vendors to see each other's work. To accomplish this, you create a separate bucket for each architectural firm and grant the following roles for the listed resources to the specified members:

Price to upgrade: If you simply want more storage, $1.99 per month gets you 50GB of storage. (That’s half the cloud storage granted by Google One for this price.) The highest tier that the service offers is appealing for families with up to six members starting on October 2nd, thanks to a recent change: it costs $9.99 per month or $99.99 annually for 6TB of cloud storage that can be split into 1TB chunks for each user. This tier also grants each user an Office 365 license for use on a computer, as well as a tablet and phone.
Users get 2 GB of free storage, file sharing and syncing and security features like SSL encryption, two-step authentication and mobile pass codes. For more storage, Dropbox offers paid subscriptions starting at $12.50 a month per user and comes with 2 TB of space. A business account with unlimited storage is also available for $20 a month per user, which includes enhanced security, team management tools, and priority email and phone support.  www.dropbox.com

Assuming you can convince your clients to adopt a new solution for file management—which might involve taking deliverables outside of their control (their cloud storage) and keeping it on a solution you set up—then I agree, it makes the most sense to consolidate everything you’re doing to a single service, rather than having to deal with a bunch of services simultaneously.

Annoyingly, to get your 3GB of free storage space you have to try out a free trial of the 'Premium' package which costs £8/US$10.42 per month. This doesn't mean you have to pay, as you can choose to revert to the Basic account, but we don't like this mechanism and it stands out when compared to almost every other cloud storage service we've tested.


Box protects all of your content with advanced security controls, encryption key management and complete information governance. Whether you need to comply with GDPR, HIPAA, PCI, GxP, FedRAMP or other major requirements, Box provides you with frictionless tools built for the most regulated industries, as well as data residency in nine countries. That way, you meet the most demanding global compliance and privacy requirements while protecting the flow of information throughout your extended enterprise.
Choosing a cloud storage product for your organization can seem like a daunting task when you first consider all of the variables involved. Striking a balance between usability, security, and customization ultimately needs to be driven by business requirements, but understanding exactly what those requirements are is a serious task that will require real work; it's not something you want to come to with a snap decision. Planning is the key. So sit down with business leads, IT managers, and even a rep from the cloud provider under consideration. Make sure that all parties are getting what they need. Only after going through that step should you pull the trigger on a provider and start the migration process.
Katherine Murray is a technology writer and the author of more than 60 books on a variety of topics, ranging from small business technology to green computing to blogging to Microsoft Office 2010. Her most recent books include Microsoft Office 2010 Plain & Simple (Microsoft Press, 2010), Microsoft Word 2010 Plain & Simple (Microsoft Press, 2010), and Microsoft Word 2010 Inside Out (Microsoft Press, 2010).

What I really like about Dropbox is that I can use it just like it was any other network drive, with pretty much any file manager on any operating system. Unlike the other services, there are no extras. Dropbox offers file storage without any frills. Sometimes that's all you need, and since it lets you easily get to your most important files no matter what device you're using, I find it extremely handy.


One of the reasons that Tresorit is so secure comes down to the way files are encrypted. With a local client installed on either your Windows or mac OS machine your data is encrypted locally, then sent to the Tresorit servers where it remains encrypted. You retain the decryption keys (not that you’ll ever see them) and not even the staff at Tresorit can access your files, thanks to their Zero-Knowledge policy.
Dropbox was among the first services to offer seamless upload and storage via its client software (though Box beat Dropbox to market by two years). The service is enhanced with an impressive ecosystem of third-party apps that integrate with Dropbox, including Salesforce, DocuSign, Jira Software, Office 365 and Slack. And though Dropbox has primarily focused on consumers and SMBs, its recent IPO filing document states that the company has ambitions for the enterprise market (and already has some large business customers). Dropbox gets high marks for being easy to use, and its growing collaboration features, such as the new Showcase interface for sharing files with partners and clients, continue to improve. Its free plan only offers 2GB of storage, however – a pittance compared to Google Drive’s 15GB.
There are many other reasons to pay for cloud storage, from getting a lot more space (a terabyte really doesn't cost all that much anymore) to being able to upload really big files. That last benefit is relevant to graphic designers, video editors, and other visual artists who often host enormous files. Other perks of paying for your cloud storage often include increased access to file-version history (meaning you can restore an important business proposal to the version you had before your colleague made a bunch of erroneous changes), more security, or more features for collaboration and working with teams.
CrashPlan combines online storage with complete backup services. The service backs up changed information as often as every minute and continues to watch for changes to data in real time. After the first backup completes, CrashPlan checks for data that is already backed up and ignores it, making subsequent backups much smaller because they contain only new or changed information.
Dropbox is very basic, and its collaborative features are a bit behind other services like Google Drive — although it did release a more synergistic tool, Dropbox Paper, in 2017. The one underlying issue is that, unlike the more classically collaborative Google Drive’s 15GB of free storage space, you’ll have to pay $10 per month if you want anything more than 2GB with Dropbox. And if you want to utilize the handy Camera Upload feature, note that photos pile up and can burn through 2GB pretty quickly. However, if you do want extra space, we suggest paying outright for a full year (you’ll end up paying less per month).
Tresorit is one of the newer and more expensive cloud storage options. However, it takes security very seriously. It features end-to-end encryption of every file uploaded to its service. Basic accounts get 1GB of storage. $12.50 per month earns you 200GB while $30 per month nets you 2TB. Additionally, the pro plans include far more security features than the free account. There are also additional options for businesses and enterprise use. It's a strong option for those who don't mind paying for it.
Its sharing capabilities don’t lack, either. You can share content with specific individuals via email or by generating a link and copying and pasting it. You can share a folder by generating a link or inviting users via email. If you use an email to share a folder, the recipients will need to register for a Tresorit account. Files can only be shared with a link and don’t have that requirement.
×