The internet has changed; with the rise of social media networks after the invention of blogging, sharing content online became a common action performed by millions of people every day. From pandas being cute to sharing financial reports, there’s almost nothing that you can’t share, which is why we’ve put together the best cloud storage for sharing.
Google Drive offers plenty of plans to choose from. The free one gives you a whopping 15GB of storage and makes it fit for our list of the best free cloud storage offers. The paid plans start at 100GB and end at 30TB, but most aren’t good value. The 1TB plan costs $9.99 per month, which is the best one among them, but it’s still not close to, say, pCloud.
Quick take: This service lets you upload as many photos (though just photos) as you want. However, Sony downsizes the images to about 3-megapixels, which roughly translates to a 6x5-inch print at 300 dpi. There’s no paid storage option. It may not be an ideal solution, but because it’s free, the service can serve as a smart secondary or tertiary backup plan because it allows for automatic photo uploads through your smartphone.
Price to upgrade: If you simply want more storage, $1.99 per month gets you 50GB of storage. (That’s half the cloud storage granted by Google One for this price.) The highest tier that the service offers is appealing for families with up to six members starting on October 2nd, thanks to a recent change: it costs $9.99 per month or $99.99 annually for 6TB of cloud storage that can be split into 1TB chunks for each user. This tier also grants each user an Office 365 license for use on a computer, as well as a tablet and phone.
Another service developed with the enterprise in mind is Box. Cloud storage and collaboration services from Box include Box for Personal use, Box for Business and Box for Enterprise IT. These professional file-sharing services are good options for IT because they allow IT to manage data access using project groups. With project groups, users and administrators can create groups to share specific documents with specific users, which helps keep data secure. Box also offers file encryption, which minimizes the chances of a document’s security being compromised. There are Box apps for Apple and Android devices.

Yes, there are a lot of things that could go wrong (take the Yahoo and Equifax data breaches, for example), but that doesn’t mean you have to live in fear of the cloud — just be smart with your data. Our top recommendations offer cutting-edge protection: two-factor authentication, facilities that are protected with 24-hour monitoring, and data that’s encrypted in “transit” (SSL and TLS) and “at rest” (128-bit AES and on).
Object Storage - Applications developed in the cloud often take advantage of object storage's vast scalablity and metadata characteristics. Object storage solutions like Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3) are ideal for building modern applications from scratch that require scale and flexibility, and can also be used to import existing data stores for analytics, backup, or archive.
Like Dropbox, Google Drive automatically syncs with the cloud so that everything is consistent across all of your devices. Also, like Dropbox, it integrates with Windows and Mac file systems. I'm sorry — and annoyed — to report that, despite many promises, Google Drive still doesn't natively support Linux. Come on, Google, get off the stick! Google Drive does, however, support Google's own Chrome OS, Android, and Apple's iOS.
OneDrive has undergone some significant updates over the last few years, and now serves as a strong foundation for Microsoft’s overall productivity solutions. It’s not so much that Microsoft OneDrive does one thing better than other cloud storage systems (other than being one of the few services to support Windows phones and Xbox). Instead, Microsoft’s cloud service delivers a well-rounded package.
Enterprise Plan: Suitable for organizations with a large number of employees, the Enterprise Plan includes all feature of lower-priced plans along with unlimited storage space, and covers administrative packages that include AD/LDAP integration, SSO, role-based administration and multi-entity management. Pricing details are available through the Egnyte sales team.

Dropbox’s Business is the top app in our file sharing websites category. It is not difficult to guess why clients trust and adore this system, most of it having nothing to do with its really moderate pricing. Dropbox Business holds a Supreme Software Award and is likely to maintain its top ranking due to the best-in-class and easy-to-use functionalities that have been helping millions of users worldwide achieve better collaboration, productivity, and overall workflow.
The internet has changed; with the rise of social media networks after the invention of blogging, sharing content online became a common action performed by millions of people every day. From pandas being cute to sharing financial reports, there’s almost nothing that you can’t share, which is why we’ve put together the best cloud storage for sharing.
That sounds great, but it can actually be very confusing, even for dedicated Apple fans like Chris Maxcer of MacNewsWorld, who found that iCloud's constant syncing of files from all his devices with full read/write permissions and an inability to tell what was on the cloud and what wasn't, had him wanting to throw his "iPhone into the street", and then to run out in traffic so he could stomp it into oblivion. I feel his pain.
In this scenario, you want to make objects available to specific users, such as users invited to try out new software. In addition, you want to invite many users, but you do not want to set permission for each user individually. At the same time, you don't want to make the objects publicly readable and send invited customers links to access the objects, because there is a risk the links may be sent to users who are not invited.

File Storage - Some applications need to access shared files and require a file system. This type of storage is often supported with a Network Attached Storage (NAS) server. File storage solutions like Amazon Elastic File System (EFS) are ideal for use cases like large content repositories, development environments, media stores, or user home directories.
Signing up for an individual account at Box gives you 10GB of cloud storage, which is a good start. Similar to Dropbox, Box natively allows its users to create text documents that can be edited in real time with collaborators. This cloud storage service also offers the ability to edit text as well as other types of documents with Microsoft’s Office tools integration, which are like Google’s suite of productivity apps, but more akin to the legacy desktop apps that some are accustomed to using.
It's a daunting task for a user to keep up with the litany of passwords required across all apps without reducing security in some way. Single Sign-On (SSO) solves some of this by having one secure password, such as the one used for a Windows Azure Active Directory or Google account. Some solutions offer this capability as a first-class citizen while others have partnerships with third-party products. Either way, from a small business perspective, this is an important feature since password management is often given low priority when compared against getting business done.
We are a startup that has to shares lots of large media files with clients. Since we use G Suite and have email for our company thereby hosted with Google, naturally instead of paying for other services, we wanted to leverage all the features. Unfortunately we found Google Drive very frustrating to use. First, you can’t share Team Drive folders publicly without the user also creating/logging into a Google account. You have to make a dupe set of the files on a non-team drive. Second, when downloading lots of files, the zip process can take forever. And finally we found moving/copying larges groups of files around to have erratic behavior with files not showing up in destinations folders for a long time and no progress indicator for the copy/move process.
MediaFire is a lesser-known file sharing/storage service, but with a free plan offering 10GB of storage, it’s worth considering. The free service lets you upload files up to 4GB in size, and uploads are scanned with the BitDefender antivirus engine. You can share file links on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest, Tumblr, and Blogger and generate a one-time download link. MediaFire is easy to use, too, with an intuitive interface.

Need to create zones in the company for sharing documents with different security levels? Simply set up an ownCloud for each zone, such as one with strict security guidelines for partners, and one internally for employees – and then connect them with Federated Cloud Sharing. With proper document classification, files tagged as internal will not be allowed across into the external ownCloud, and yet other files can be made publicly available. Further, employees can access files that reside on the partner server, all through the same internal server and the desktop, mobile or web apps they are used to using. In this way, document controls can be retained, and frictionless collaboration can still occur.


Personal mobile devices, especially when used in Bring-Your-Own-Device (BYOD) scenarios, add new challenges to controlling the flow of sensitive documents and information. Capabilities such as remote wipe or digital rights management can go a long way in limiting how far information can spread outside of the organization, especially when these devices are lost or compromised. Some products offer these features out of the box, while others use third-party offerings to close this gap, such as Microsoft Windows Intune.

Quick take: If you’re an Amazon Prime member, you already have access to this free unlimited service. And unlike most free options, Amazon Photos has no size restrictions for images. For files larger than 2GB, though, you have to use the free Amazon Drive Desktop app instead of the Drive website to upload images. Like photo storage services from Apple and Google, Amazon Photos also features a mobile app, Prime Photos, which offers editing features, tagging, support for those “live” motion photos you see on smartphones, and machine-learning-supported search. That last perk uses artificial intelligence to recognize objects in your photos, which can help locate items in your collection. For instance, you can use search terms such as “tree,” “cat,” or “man” to find the photo you’re looking for. 

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Cloud file sharing provides end users with the ability to access files with any Internet-capable device from any location. Usually, the user has the ability to grant access privileges to other users as they see fit. Although cloud file sharing services are easy to use, the user must rely upon the service provider ability to provide high availability (HA) and backup and recovery in a timely manner.  

In this scenario, you want to make objects available to specific users, such as users invited to try out new software. In addition, you want to invite many users, but you do not want to set permission for each user individually. At the same time, you don't want to make the objects publicly readable and send invited customers links to access the objects, because there is a risk the links may be sent to users who are not invited.

Distinct from but overlapping in some cases with cloud storage are online backup services. Some of these, such as Carbonite, are all about disaster recovery, while IDrive combines that goal with syncing and sharing capabilities. If you want to bypass the cloud for your backup, you can still go with local backup software, which saves you the time it takes to upload and download your data.

Annoyingly, to get your 3GB of free storage space you have to try out a free trial of the 'Premium' package which costs £8/US$10.42 per month. This doesn't mean you have to pay, as you can choose to revert to the Basic account, but we don't like this mechanism and it stands out when compared to almost every other cloud storage service we've tested.
Almost as important as keeping information safe is making information accessible across the diverse landscape of devices that users bring to the mix. The primary candidates are the typical: Microsoft Windows, Linux, and a variety of Android flavors, as well as Apple's iOS and OS X. For any platform to be effective in today's business landscape, web access is a must. In some cases, an authorized device is not always available. Being able to grab a quick document for a meeting or push a business-critical document from a remote computer can be a lifesaver for an ever-increasing distributed workforce—a lifesaver that users expect to be available to them.
In terms of sharing data, at a minimum, this should take the form of a sync client, meaning software that resides on each registered client and which takes care of making sure data in the cloud is synced with any local replicas. But it can also have other points of access. For instance, Microsoft OneDrive for Business syncs with the Team sites that are part of the popular Microsoft SharePoint collaboration platform, while Box for Business offers a fully functional web client with drag-and-drop support. Shared data can be stored in folders originated by individuals or in team folders that are created by team leads or administrators (and are accessible to anyone on the team). Some version of team folders should be considered a necessary component of any business-grade cloud storage app. By creating central points of collaboration that don't originate from any one user, it becomes easier to grant and revoke access as well as pass on ownership when an individual leaves the organization or changes divisions.
Best Answer: Overall, Microsoft OneDrive has the best value if you're going to pay, at 1TB for $6.99 a month, and that includes an Office 365 subscription. For the most space and versatility without having to ever pay a dime, then you can't go wrong with Google Drive's free 15GB. Mega is another good option for the most free storage right out of the gate (50GB), however, while it offers end-to-end encryption on your files, it's not as versatile with third-party integrations like other services.

How you use it: You can upload any kind of file with no restrictions on image resolution or single file-size. You can also choose how often you want selected files and folders to be automatically backed up. To access your data, simply click on 'Cold Storage' and click through to select the files you want and they'll start downloading within three to five hours – see full step-by-step instructions.
Details: Apple iCloud Drive comes with 5GB of free cloud storage. Users looking to bump up their storage can do so for $0.99/month for 50GBs; $2.99/month for 200GB; $9.99/month for 1TB and $19.99 for 2TB. ICloud is meant for Apple users, but there is an iCloud app for Windows. A third-party app is needed to access iCloud storage from Android devices.
There are several services to pick from, and some of them are pretty similar. While common at their core offerings (to give you copious amounts of space to store files online), only a few go beyond that by giving users more free storage upfront, useful online productivity tools, and the option to expand storage well above the 1TB mark. Here are the most popular services and how to determine which one is right for you.
Apple iCloud is a cloud-based file-syncing and storage solution that enables users to store files in the cloud. The stored files are automatically synced to all devices in the account including both Windows and Mac PCs. The service comes with offerings such as the iCloud Photo Library and iCloud Drive, where you can keep all your files stored securely and updated everywhere. The Family Sharing feature lets you easily photos, movies, music and more with your family members. Find My iPhone helps you find your Apple device if you lose it.
Sharing via email is a very common way to share files with others. The process starts by finding the files to share, adding the contact's email address and clicking share. The software emails your contact a link to the shared files. Sometimes your recipients will have to sign up for an account with the cloud service. This takes a little extra time, but it adds a layer of privacy and security.

If your employees rely heavily on Microsoft Office applications and documents, OneDrive may be for you. Formerly known as SkyDrive Pro, OneDrive for Business is part of the Microsoft Office 365 suite of collaboration and productivity tools. The platform allows storage of any file type, but provides the best value and integration when saving, viewing and editing Word, Excel and PowerPoint documents. Users can view and modify Office files within a browser or download them for local editing, or they can sync and share files with SharePoint. The service is included in Office 365 for business, SharePoint Online plans, and SharePoint 2013.
Public Cloud computing, commonly referred to as “the cloud” is a type of computing that involves storing, sharing and accessing data, programs and files over the Internet, as opposed to storing, accessing and sharing data, files and programs on your hard drive. The cloud has proven to be very beneficial for small business owners and the average Joe alike.
“Slow Wide Turns operates and communicates between multiple systems and cities scattered throughout the U.S., and file sharing and system backing is crucial to our success and overall company organization. Our design department is constantly submitting artwork files to be reviewed by directors and owners who operate in cities 500 miles apart. Uploading files to a well-organized, shared Google Drive account allows for a swift review process and has nearly eliminated the shortcomings related to file sharing and storage we had previously experienced.”
Common types of storage, transmission, and distribution include the use of distributed peer-to-peer networking, centralized servers on computer networks, online-based hyperlinked documents, and manual sharing of transportable media. In this article, we’ll take a look at the best file sharing software services to help you select the best system for your needs.
Data security is a growing concern, and no small matter. A recent study by the Ponemon Institute found that the average consolidated total cost of a data breach is $3.8 million. That number can represent the cost of lost business opportunities and patents, decreased customer trust, and a need for reputation management for your business. ShareFile cloud storage can improve the integrity of your data security by ensuring that all your important files are protected by our world-class SSAE 16 Type II accredited datacenters with up to 256-bit encryption.
For some reason, OneDrive doesn’t include built-in sharing options in Windows 8.1’s File Explorer. You could use the OneDrive “Store app” to change these settings, but you’d probably prefer to use the website on your desktop. Windows 8.1’s OneDrive integration also doesn’t offer a way to sync folders and files shared with you to the desktop. You’ll have to access them in the web browser. OneDrive does offer all the same sharing settings as Dropbox and Google Drive, but you’ll need to use your browser — you may want to use Dropbox or Google Drive if Windows desktop integration is important to you.
There are multiple reasons to use cloud storage services. Maybe your local hard drives are running low on disk space, in which case you can use the cloud as extra storage. If you want to be able to stream your music collection from anywhere, access your work files at home, easily share vacation videos, etc., you can upload your files online to a cloud storage service. Another reason to use cloud storage is if you want to keep important files secure behind a password and encryption.
You can access your cloud files through an app or software installed on your computer (once it's installed, it's usually pretty much invisible), though you need an internet connection for it to work. If you temporarily don't have an internet connection, that's okay. The service waits until the next time you do have a connection and takes care of business then.
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