For some computer owners, finding enough storage space to hold all the data they've acquired is a real challenge. Some people invest in larger hard drives. Others prefer external storage devices like thumb drives or compact discs. Desperate computer owners might delete entire folders worth of old files in order to make space for new information. But some are choosing to rely on a growing trend: cloud storage.
Mobile compatibility has gained a place in the ecosystem of business. This especially applies to road warriors who frequently work in planes, cars, and subways. Space is often at a premium, and the ability to prepare for a meeting or analyze a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet on the go is a necessity. Having a cloud storage solution that can provide these capabilities to users via a software client optimized for their particular operating system (OS), be it Android, iOS, even Windows Phone, is a feature you should look for in a competitive service offering. For example, Dropbox Business recently added some new mobile features on iOS that let users see file activity and team feedback in file preview.
Who doesn't use Dropbox? Sure, its free storage is only 2GB, but you can use it on any platform. You can get to your files from Dropbox's website, desktop applications for Mac, Windows, and Linux, their native files systems, and the iOS, Android, BlackBerry, and Kindle Fire mobile apps. It's a snap to set up, and you don't need to worry about syncing files for a second.
While remote file storage has been with us for decade — I had remote storage on a Unix server using file transfer protocol (ftp) and NFS (Network File System) in the 80s — cloud storage for the masses didn't really get going until 2007 when Drew Houston, Dropbox's CEO and founder, got sick and tired of never being able to "remember to keep my USB drive with me".
What I really like about Dropbox is that I can use it just like it was any other network drive, with pretty much any file manager on any operating system. Unlike the other services, there are no extras. Dropbox offers file storage without any frills. Sometimes that's all you need, and since it lets you easily get to your most important files no matter what device you're using, I find it extremely handy.

Not only will uploading your files make it easier to collaborate with your team, but it will free space on your hard drive, too. Plus, in the event that your hard drive malfunctions or gets stolen, your files will still be in the cloud. Documents, designs, reports or even bigger files, such as 3D models and movies, are all good candidates for a trip to the cloud.

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