MediaFire is a lesser-known file sharing/storage service, but with a free plan offering 10GB of storage, it’s worth considering. The free service lets you upload files up to 4GB in size, and uploads are scanned with the BitDefender antivirus engine. You can share file links on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest, Tumblr, and Blogger and generate a one-time download link. MediaFire is easy to use, too, with an intuitive interface.
ZumoDrive works with Windows, Mac, Linux, iPhone, Android, and Palm Pre and seems to be making a lot of people happy. Designed to give you access to all your files — music, documents, videos, photos, and more — wherever you are and no matter what device or platform you're using, ZumoDrive's tag line is "cloud storage that appears local." ZumoDrive gives you 1GB of free storage. You can also choose a for-fee subscription plan that works for you —ranging from 10GB for $2.99/month all the way up to 500GB for $79.99/month.
Another real nice feature is, unlike many other cloud-backup services, iDrive doesn't lock you down to a single computer. You can use one account to backup your Windows and macOS desktops, your Android smartphone and iPhones and tablets, and network drives. There's also a Linux backup option, but it's meant for Linux servers. There is no Linux personal storage.

Quick take: While Shutterfly is best known as a photo-printing service, it also offers free, unlimited storage for photos. (Sorry, no videos, spreadsheet documents, etc.) And as with Amazon, there’s no real limit to the size of the photos you can upload. But here’s the catch: Shutterfly doesn’t offer full-resolution downloading. Instead, you get a scaled-down 2-megapixel file, similar to those provided by Nikon’s service.

We are a startup that has to shares lots of large media files with clients. Since we use G Suite and have email for our company thereby hosted with Google, naturally instead of paying for other services, we wanted to leverage all the features. Unfortunately we found Google Drive very frustrating to use. First, you can’t share Team Drive folders publicly without the user also creating/logging into a Google account. You have to make a dupe set of the files on a non-team drive. Second, when downloading lots of files, the zip process can take forever. And finally we found moving/copying larges groups of files around to have erratic behavior with files not showing up in destinations folders for a long time and no progress indicator for the copy/move process.
Box brings you automated workflow, collaboration and machine learning integrations to connect your business processes and content on our secure Cloud Content Management platform. And since Box works across your entire organization, you simplify processes that span many different teams — including digital asset management, contract management, virtual data rooms, HR onboarding, sales enablement, custom app development and much more.
Thank you so very much, Branko! I hadn’t come across Sync at all until I read your review here. I’ve signed with them, and they are terrific! Much faster servers than Dropbox have been for me here in Australia. I was desperate to get a large audio file to a client. After days, Dropbox was still dropping out. Sync had it loaded in just over 1/2 hour! Amazing! I greatly appreciate the time you’ve put into this article.
Apple's iCloud service includes iCloud Photo Sharing, which lets you share images and video with friends, family, and colleagues on an iPhone, iPad, Mac, PC, or Apple TV. While technically considered part of iCloud Photo Library, iCloud Photo Sharing exists outside of the service: You don't have to use iCloud Photo Library to share your images, and shared albums don't count toward your iCloud storage.
In terms of platform support, Carbonite has clients for Windows and MacOS, and apps for Android and iOS. The file storage offers several data storage plans that vary in price. The basic storage plan costs $72 a year and provides full backup for a single computer. Carbonite also offers advanced services, like localized backup, but those plans cost more.
Two of the oldest cloud storage file sharing platforms on the market nowadays are SugarSync and Box.com, both launched in 2005.  Followed by Google Docs in 2006 and OneDrive in 2007. Dropbox has reached an incredibly high number of users, 300 million since launch in 2007. Google Drive has 240 million users and according to Microsoft, OneDrive has more than 250 million users.  These applications have been highly adopted as they are very easy to use and accessible to anyone.  With most vendors leading with their ‘Freemium’ pricing strategy, by which a product or service is provided free of charge, it’s a no-brainer for anyone who is looking to implement and trial cloud storage for themselves.
It’s not quite as platform-limited as iCloud, but OneDrive will definitely appeal most to dedicated Windows users. And if you are one, it’s a good deal! Not only is the pricing competitive, but Microsoft also throws in an Office 365 subscription. (And vice versa; if you subscribe to Office 365, you also get OneDrive storage. The power of bundles!) The service itself, from interface to features, doesn’t blow the doors off otherwise, but if you’re firmly entrenched in Windowsworld you could surely do worse.
In late 2015, Microsoft made an announcement that it would no longer offer unlimited cloud storage to Office 365 subscribers. Instead, they are limited to 1TB. Additionally, beginning in early 2016, the 100GB and 200GB paid storage plans will be discontinued, replaced with a 50GB for $1.99 per month plan. You will no longer get extra space if you allow the OneDrive apps to automatically backup photos on your phone. Finally, anyone with a Microsoft account will only get 5GB of free storage, instead of 15GB. We will update this guide in 2016 when those changes are made.

Cloud storage is a critical component of cloud computing, holding the information used by applications. Big data analytics, data warehouses, Internet of Things, databases, and backup and archive applications all rely on some form of data storage architecture. Cloud storage is typically more reliable, scalable, and secure than traditional on-premises storage systems.
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Quick take: If you’re an Amazon Prime member, you already have access to this free unlimited service. And unlike most free options, Amazon Photos has no size restrictions for images. For files larger than 2GB, though, you have to use the free Amazon Drive Desktop app instead of the Drive website to upload images. Like photo storage services from Apple and Google, Amazon Photos also features a mobile app, Prime Photos, which offers editing features, tagging, support for those “live” motion photos you see on smartphones, and machine-learning-supported search. That last perk uses artificial intelligence to recognize objects in your photos, which can help locate items in your collection. For instance, you can use search terms such as “tree,” “cat,” or “man” to find the photo you’re looking for. 


In 1994, AT&T launched PersonaLink Services, an online platform for personal and business communication and entrepreneurship. The storage was one of the first to be all web-based, and referenced in their commercials as, "you can think of our electronic meeting place as the cloud."[3] Amazon Web Services introduced their cloud storage service AWS S3 in 2006, and has gained widespread recognition and adoption as the storage supplier to popular services such as SmugMug, Dropbox, and Pinterest. In 2005, Box announced an online file sharing and personal cloud content management service for businesses.[4]
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