A cloud storage service is less practical as an always-on backup solution and more helpful as a way to back up specific files that you want to have access to from anywhere or share with others. The file versions in the cloud storage account are the same as the versions you uploaded, regardless if you changed them on your computer. Like online backup, you can still download the files again should you need to, like if your computer crashes.
Signing up for an individual account at Box gives you 10GB of cloud storage, which is a good start. Similar to Dropbox, Box natively allows its users to create text documents that can be edited in real time with collaborators. This cloud storage service also offers the ability to edit text as well as other types of documents with Microsoft’s Office tools integration, which are like Google’s suite of productivity apps, but more akin to the legacy desktop apps that some are accustomed to using.

In terms of sharing data, at a minimum, this should take the form of a sync client, meaning software that resides on each registered client and which takes care of making sure data in the cloud is synced with any local replicas. But it can also have other points of access. For instance, Microsoft OneDrive for Business syncs with the Team sites that are part of the popular Microsoft SharePoint collaboration platform, while Box for Business offers a fully functional web client with drag-and-drop support. Shared data can be stored in folders originated by individuals or in team folders that are created by team leads or administrators (and are accessible to anyone on the team). Some version of team folders should be considered a necessary component of any business-grade cloud storage app. By creating central points of collaboration that don't originate from any one user, it becomes easier to grant and revoke access as well as pass on ownership when an individual leaves the organization or changes divisions.
SpiderOak is meant mostly for business use, but it also offers a 2GB free service, and an affordable personal plan that offers 100GB for $10 a month. For businesses, SpikerOak offers a service that starts at a terabyte for $600. It's one down side is that I found it to be a bit slower than the others when downloading or uploading files. It was not, however, anywhere near as slow as Mega.
There are several options available to avoid such issues. One option is to use a private cloud instead of a public cloud (there are as well providers that offer private cloud storage). Another option is to ingest data in encrypted format where the key is hold within your on premise infrastructure. Access is often by use of cloud storage gateways that are on premise. Such gateways have options not only to encrypt and compress the data prior of transfer but as well mirror the storage across multiple cloud storage providers and remove the risk of a single providers shutdown. Gateways offer as well the option to cache data on a most recently used algorithm on premise. Along with data analytics data is cached and fetched on a most valuable form instead of recently used only form.
Amazon Abiquo Enterprise Edition CloudStack Citrix Cloud CtrlS DigitalOcean EMC Atmos Eucalyptus Fujitsu GoGrid Google Cloud Platform GreenButton GreenQloud IBM Cloud iland Joyent Lunacloud Mirantis Nimbula Nimbus OpenIO OpenNebula OpenStack Oracle Cloud OrionVM Rackspace Cloud Safe Swiss Cloud SoftLayer Zadara Storage libvirt libguestfs OVirt Virtual Machine Manager Wakame-vdc Virtual Private Cloud OnDemand
Need to create zones in the company for sharing documents with different security levels? Simply set up an ownCloud for each zone, such as one with strict security guidelines for partners, and one internally for employees – and then connect them with Federated Cloud Sharing. With proper document classification, files tagged as internal will not be allowed across into the external ownCloud, and yet other files can be made publicly available. Further, employees can access files that reside on the partner server, all through the same internal server and the desktop, mobile or web apps they are used to using. In this way, document controls can be retained, and frictionless collaboration can still occur.
Microsoft doesn’t offer encryption services for personal OneDrive accounts; business and SharePoint online are the company’s only encrypted online storage platforms. This means if you want to use your own personal account through Microsoft’s cloud and not have to deal with potentially compromised information, you might have to encrypt your own data to ensure your files are secure. In addition, the company’s history of battling “privacy concerns” goes hand-in-hand with its reputation for tracking users without transparent disclosure.
Google Drive offers plenty of plans to choose from. The free one gives you a whopping 15GB of storage and makes it fit for our list of the best free cloud storage offers. The paid plans start at 100GB and end at 30TB, but most aren’t good value. The 1TB plan costs $9.99 per month, which is the best one among them, but it’s still not close to, say, pCloud.
Sharing via email is a very common way to share files with others. The process starts by finding the files to share, adding the contact's email address and clicking share. The software emails your contact a link to the shared files. Sometimes your recipients will have to sign up for an account with the cloud service. This takes a little extra time, but it adds a layer of privacy and security.
iCloud requires iOS 5 or later on iPhone 3GS or later, iPod touch (3rd generation or later), iPad Pro, iPad or later, iPad Air or later, or iPad mini or later; a Mac computer with OS X Lion 10.7.5 or later; or a PC with Windows 7 or Windows 8 (Outlook 2007 or later or an up-to-date browser is required for accessing email, contacts, and calendars). Some features require iOS 11 and macOS High Sierra. Some features require a Wi-Fi connection. Some features are not available in all countries or regions. Access to some services is limited to 10 devices.

Organizations can choose between off-premises and on-premises cloud storage options, or a mixture of the two options, depending on relevant decision criteria that is complementary to initial direct cost savings potential; for instance, continuity of operations (COOP), disaster recovery (DR), security (PII, HIPAA, SARBOX, IA/CND), and records retention laws, regulations, and policies.[12]


Sharing via email is a very common way to share files with others. The process starts by finding the files to share, adding the contact's email address and clicking share. The software emails your contact a link to the shared files. Sometimes your recipients will have to sign up for an account with the cloud service. This takes a little extra time, but it adds a layer of privacy and security.
Some cloud storage services offer pretty healthy free storage plans for individual users, which becomes a good way to start things off. Then there are others that offer superb deals of free storage bundled with devices from manufacturers like Apple and HP. The thumb rule is – cloud vendors don’t get hurt by giving away free storage, if it gets them new clients for premium services. Look for it and you shall find it.
Google Drive’s standout features are its sharing and collaboration tools. Thanks to integration with Gmail and other Google services, you can share files with a click, with or without requiring a password. When you work with partners on the same word file, spreadsheet, or presentation, either separately or right at the same time, Google Drive marks the contributions of each person with different colored labels to make clear what has changed.
To know how to tailor your cloud storage search, you’ll need to know how much available data you want at your fingertips. Are you sharing files all the time? Are you uploading photos (which are bigger files than documents) constantly and wanting to maintain their resolution? Once you have a decent idea of what you use on a daily basis, you’ll be able to narrow your search based on data storage availability and price.

SendSpace is a file-sharing utility that's been around since 2005. It includes a desktop tool — for Windows, Mac, and Linux systems — and mobile apps for iPhone and Android phones. SendSpace's claim to fame is that you can share gargantuan files with others securely, and it functions more like a conduit for your files (you're sending them, after all) than a cloud storage space for information you want to share with others. This ability to send mega-size files has worked well for me. I've used it to send gigabytes of book files to colleagues in other countries, and the service has been easy to use and reasonably prompt for those times when I need to deliver a file right away.


SoonR is another popular cloud offering that gives you tools for sharing files across multiple devices and platforms. One big difference here is that the only free thing about SoonR is its 30-day trial period; after that, the premium plan ($9.99/month) enables you to share 25GB of storage with three team members. You can also upgrade your account to a Pro account ($29.99/month), which increases your team members to five and your storage space to 100GB.
Need big business cloud storage at small business-friendly prices? Zoolz gives small businesses access to powerful cloud storage without the sticker shock. Unlike its competitors, Zoolz comes with unlimited users and servers, making it easy to scale the service to your business's needs. There are also no caps on your upload/download bandwidth speeds or file sizes, so you don't have to worry about not being able to use the service when you need it most. Zoolz also offers "Tribrid" backup service which combines your local backup, their instant storage and cold storage.
No, Dropbox doesn't have many bells or whistles. No, it doesn't offer the most storage for free or the least amount of money. All it does is let me create, add, delete, move, copy, edit, whatever file and directories just as if they were any other file on my system. It doesn't matter if I'm using Linux, Mac, or Windows, or most smartphones or tablets; it just works with my device's native interfaces. That means I don't have to think about how to use it, I just use it. That makes it a winner in my book.
In this scenario, a construction company works with several architectural design firms that deliver building plans for various projects. The construction company wants to set up a drop box for the vendor firms so they can upload architectural plans at various project milestones. The drop box must ensure the privacy of the construction company's clients, which means the drop box cannot allow the vendors to see each other's work. To accomplish this, you create a separate bucket for each architectural firm and grant the following roles for the listed resources to the specified members:
There are many other reasons to pay for cloud storage, from getting a lot more space (a terabyte really doesn't cost all that much anymore) to being able to upload really big files. That last benefit is relevant to graphic designers, video editors, and other visual artists who often host enormous files. Other perks of paying for your cloud storage often include increased access to file-version history (meaning you can restore an important business proposal to the version you had before your colleague made a bunch of erroneous changes), more security, or more features for collaboration and working with teams.
Today, as far as file sharing goes, we have nearly endless options. Dropbox, Box, Google Drive, Microsoft OneDrive and Hightail – formerly YouSendIt – are among the services that enable you to share big files easily, as well as store them in the cloud, sync them across multiple devices, and collaborate on them with colleagues and clients. But there are plenty of others, ranging from basic services for consumers (Amazon Drive) to security-conscious, enterprise-level services (Tresorit). The services we've chosen are listed here in alphabetical order and focus on 10 that cover the range of options available. (This isn’t an exhaustive catalog of all services.) To check file transfer times for each, we uploaded a 195MB ZIP file using a connection with an average 11.88 megabit/second upload speed.

Storage used to be the IT professional's nightmare. Back when everything was stored on an ever-growing pile of hard disks in the basement, it was easy to run out of space at just the wrong time or forget to back up the right disk shortly before it crashed. But then came the cloud, and along with that fuzzy miracle comes endlessly scalable storage at a very nice price. Storage that increases automatically the more of it you need and often protects itself, too. That said, there are still many important features that cloud-based storage and file sharing platforms need to contain before they can be considered ready for business.

Price to upgrade: If you simply want more storage, $1.99 per month gets you 50GB of storage. (That’s half the cloud storage granted by Google One for this price.) The highest tier that the service offers is appealing for families with up to six members starting on October 2nd, thanks to a recent change: it costs $9.99 per month or $99.99 annually for 6TB of cloud storage that can be split into 1TB chunks for each user. This tier also grants each user an Office 365 license for use on a computer, as well as a tablet and phone.

Microsoft doesn’t offer encryption services for personal OneDrive accounts; business and SharePoint online are the company’s only encrypted online storage platforms. This means if you want to use your own personal account through Microsoft’s cloud and not have to deal with potentially compromised information, you might have to encrypt your own data to ensure your files are secure. In addition, the company’s history of battling “privacy concerns” goes hand-in-hand with its reputation for tracking users without transparent disclosure.


As a Samsung customer, you get 15GB of free storage in Samsung Cloud. That means you can sync and back up photos, apps, contacts, data, and so on using Samsung Cloud on your phone. But if you need more, you can purchase additional space at any time. Keep reading to learn about the different subscription plans, how to view your current usage, and upgrade your storage amount. You can also access Samsung Cloud via our web portal, and learn more about viewing your information stored in Samsung Cloud on the web.
Controlling permissions varies from product to product. Some solutions offer a highly granular hierarchy of permissions. In addition to the ability to define job roles and assign access based on that, multiple nested groups can be established. Adding or removing permissions is an easy affair once they're properly defined. Other products opt for a more simplified approach.
Microsoft OneDrive integrates with Office Online which you can use to collaborate with others no matter the plan you subscribe to. If you want to take notes and share them you can use OneNote. To communicate with others, there’s Skype which is integrated with the web client. Productivity apps include Forms for workflow management and Sway for content publishing.
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