Upgrading to the Personal Pro plan will cost you £80/US$10 per month, earning you 100GB of storage and a file size limit of 5GB, or you could switch to the Starter business plan for £4/US$5 per month, which also offers 100GB, a slightly lower 2GB file size, but works with teams of 3-10 people, supports document encryption, granular permissions and stores previous versions of any file.
The internet has changed; with the rise of social media networks after the invention of blogging, sharing content online became a common action performed by millions of people every day. From pandas being cute to sharing financial reports, there’s almost nothing that you can’t share, which is why we’ve put together the best cloud storage for sharing.
Mega is the sequel to the now-defunct Megaupload, a cloud storage service that was taken down by the authorities a couple of years ago. Mega is an up-and-coming service that gives users 50GB for free. That's the largest sign-on bonus we've seen among all of these cloud storage apps and services. It comes with a range of storage options that span from 200GB to 8TB. The app is quite flashy but there are a few bugs here and there that some people have experienced. Its biggest feature is that it encrypts all files uploaded to it for added security and protection.
In this scenario, a construction company works with several architectural design firms that deliver building plans for various projects. The construction company wants to set up a drop box for the vendor firms so they can upload architectural plans at various project milestones. The drop box must ensure the privacy of the construction company's clients, which means the drop box cannot allow the vendors to see each other's work. To accomplish this, you create a separate bucket for each architectural firm and grant the following roles for the listed resources to the specified members:
Organizations can choose between off-premises and on-premises cloud storage options, or a mixture of the two options, depending on relevant decision criteria that is complementary to initial direct cost savings potential; for instance, continuity of operations (COOP), disaster recovery (DR), security (PII, HIPAA, SARBOX, IA/CND), and records retention laws, regulations, and policies.[12]

A cloud storage service is less practical as an always-on backup solution and more helpful as a way to back up specific files that you want to have access to from anywhere or share with others. The file versions in the cloud storage account are the same as the versions you uploaded, regardless if you changed them on your computer. Like online backup, you can still download the files again should you need to, like if your computer crashes.


Cloud storage is a cloud computing model that stores data on the Internet through a cloud computing provider who manages and operates data storage as a service. It’s delivered on demand with just-in-time capacity and costs, and eliminates buying and managing your own data storage infrastructure. This gives you agility, global scale and durability, with “anytime, anywhere” data access.
Another real nice feature is, unlike many other cloud-backup services, iDrive doesn't lock you down to a single computer. You can use one account to backup your Windows and macOS desktops, your Android smartphone and iPhones and tablets, and network drives. There's also a Linux backup option, but it's meant for Linux servers. There is no Linux personal storage.
Details: Backblaze offers personal computer backup and business cloud storage services. But it also has an offer for 10GB of free cloud storage. Additional storage is $0.005/GB/month. There is a limit in the free version of 1GB downloaded per day. Mac and PC backups are $5 per computer per month, or $50 per year. Business plans start at $5 per computer per month, or $5 per month per TB.
Like most file-sharing interfaces, Google lets you specify the people you want viewing or editing your work at any given time, and you can easily grant or deny access requests. You can also opt for Google’s Backup and Sync feature, which lets you connect your Drive to your personal computer and any other files you choose outside the existing data in your cloud storage.
These services provide seamless access to all your important data—Word docs, PDFs, spreadsheets, photos, any other digital assets from wherever you are. You no longer need to be sitting at your work PC to see your work files: With cloud syncing you can get to them from your smartphone on the train, from your tablet on your couch, and from the laptop in your hotel room or kitchen. Using a service like those included here means no more having to email files to yourself or plug and unplug USB thumb drives.
In this scenario, a client wants to make specific files available to specific individuals through simple browser downloads. You can do this by using the Cloud Storage cookie-based authentication. To use the feature, you grant a user permission to access an object, and then you give the user a special URL to the object. When the user clicks the URL, Cloud Storage prompts them to sign in to their Google account (if they are not already logged in) and the object is downloaded to their computer. The following users will be able to download the object:
If you want to build your business around Google Drive, you can do that too. Google Drive for Work includes unlimited storage for files, folders, and backups for $8 per user per month plus $0.04 per GB. With it, you can sync all your business files, including Microsoft Office files, across your computer, smartphone, and tablet to access your work whenever you need it.
If you’re comfortable dealing with a more manual approach, you can always pick up a great NAS box—a network-attached storage device—and use that to host your data. It shouldn’t be that tricky to set up user accounts for your clients and launch some kind of online portal they can use to view, send, and download files. (Or you can grant them access to a simple FTP server, if you want.) You could also setup your own dedicated server, but that’s a bit more complex than a NAS box.

Price to upgrade: Amazon offers several upgrades that are priced competitively to Google One. For $11.99 per year, you can upgrade your account to 100GB. If you want more, 1TB costs $59.99 per year, and 2TB doubles that price. If your work requires a lot of cloud storage, Amazon Drive is the way to go, since it offers 30TB of storage for $1,799.70 per year compared to Google’s price of approximately $3,588 for the same amount.
You can access your cloud files through an app or software installed on your computer (once it's installed, it's usually pretty much invisible), though you need an internet connection for it to work. If you temporarily don't have an internet connection, that's okay. The service waits until the next time you do have a connection and takes care of business then.
Like most of the cloud services, SkyDrive lets you save, share, and access files, but on most operating systems, you must use it through a browser — IE by choice, but it will work with others. However, SkyDrive does work hand-in-glove with the Windows 8 file manager. It also works well in partnership with Microsoft Office. Like Google Drive, it comes with its own cloud-based office software: Office Web Apps.
Keep your password secure. Change your password regularly and don't use the same password across multiple websites. If hackers crack one password it's a pain, but if they access all your online accounts it can be a nightmare. As many sites use your email as a login ID, using the same password increases your security risk (see 60 seconds on password security for more info).
Apple’s cloud storage service doesn’t make waves on paper, but it’s great if you use iTunes as your central media hub. iCloud provides 5GB of free storage, while upgrading to 50 GB will cost $1/month, 200GB for $3/month, and 2TB for $10/month. Items downloaded from iTunes won’t count against your storage limit, but note that iOS devices use iCloud for backup, and that alone can quickly use up storage allotments.
It’s not quite as platform-limited as iCloud, but OneDrive will definitely appeal most to dedicated Windows users. And if you are one, it’s a good deal! Not only is the pricing competitive, but Microsoft also throws in an Office 365 subscription. (And vice versa; if you subscribe to Office 365, you also get OneDrive storage. The power of bundles!) The service itself, from interface to features, doesn’t blow the doors off otherwise, but if you’re firmly entrenched in Windowsworld you could surely do worse.
Kids under 13 can have their own Apple IDs.3 As a parent or legal guardian, the organizer creates the child’s Apple ID and adds the child to the family group. Ask to Buy is turned on by default, and the organizer can also limit the content kids have access to on their devices through Restrictions on an iOS device or parental controls in macOS and iTunes.
Sharing via email is a very common way to share files with others. The process starts by finding the files to share, adding the contact's email address and clicking share. The software emails your contact a link to the shared files. Sometimes your recipients will have to sign up for an account with the cloud service. This takes a little extra time, but it adds a layer of privacy and security.

Users with specific records-keeping requirements, such as public agencies that must retain electronic records according to statute, may encounter complications with using cloud computing and storage. For instance, the U.S. Department of Defense designated the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) to maintain a list of records management products that meet all of the records retention, personally identifiable information (PII), and security (Information Assurance; IA) requirements[23]
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