Mediafire might be a new name to many, but the Texan company has been around for nearly ten years, starting off as a file sharing service. You can still share files in much the way that you can on Google Drive, Onedrive, Dropbox and others, and can post pictures, videos, and other files directly to Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Tumblr,  Google+, or Blogger, from within the Mediafire portal.
In addition, iCloud Drive, in my experience, is prone to be slow and quirky. I've had trouble syncing files between my Macs and iDevices. Eventually, I think iCloud Drive will be for Apple users what OneDrive already is for Windows, but it's still having teething problems. However, as a business solution? It's not there now, and I doubt it ever will be.
SoonR is another popular cloud offering that gives you tools for sharing files across multiple devices and platforms. One big difference here is that the only free thing about SoonR is its 30-day trial period; after that, the premium plan ($9.99/month) enables you to share 25GB of storage with three team members. You can also upgrade your account to a Pro account ($29.99/month), which increases your team members to five and your storage space to 100GB.
No, Dropbox doesn't have many bells or whistles. No, it doesn't offer the most storage for free or the least amount of money. All it does is let me create, add, delete, move, copy, edit, whatever file and directories just as if they were any other file on my system. It doesn't matter if I'm using Linux, Mac, or Windows, or most smartphones or tablets; it just works with my device's native interfaces. That means I don't have to think about how to use it, I just use it. That makes it a winner in my book.

iCloud also acts as a media sharing hub that works closely with Apple’s cloud-based productivity suite, iWork. It includes a word processor, among other things that can be shared with other iCloud users, all with an interface that looks a bit cleaner and more modular than Google Docs. Still, Apple can’t compete with Google’s price point or the universality of Google accounts.
Price to upgrade: Paying $1 per month will add 50GB to your iCloud account. Apple matches Google One’s pricing with the next upgrades being 200GB and 2TB, which cost $2.99 per month and $9.99 per month, respectively. An extra 50GB in the cloud might be all that you need, but opting for 200GB or more will let you split the data among your family with iCloud’s Family Sharing feature.
Storage used to be the IT professional's nightmare. Back when everything was stored on an ever-growing pile of hard disks in the basement, it was easy to run out of space at just the wrong time or forget to back up the right disk shortly before it crashed. But then came the cloud, and along with that fuzzy miracle comes endlessly scalable storage at a very nice price. Storage that increases automatically the more of it you need and often protects itself, too. That said, there are still many important features that cloud-based storage and file sharing platforms need to contain before they can be considered ready for business.

In this scenario, a company's marketing analyst wants to use Cloud Storage to back up confidential revenue forecasts and sales projection data. The data must be accessible only by the marketing analyst. The company's IT department oversees and manages the company's Cloud Storage account. Their primary management responsibilities include creating and sharing buckets so that various departments throughout the company have access to Cloud Storage.
Upthere Home is one of the newer cloud storage apps on mobile. It's by Western Digital, the hard drive manufacturer. It works similarly to Google Photos rather than other types of cloud storage. It features automatic uploads of photos and videos with a UI centered around viewing such content. However, it does support other file types as well. This one also has simple pricing. The app features a single pricing option at $1.99 for 100GB of storage. It's simple, it works okay, and it's cheap. That may be good enough for many. Western Digital also has a My Cloud app that works with most of their hard drives. It's another decent option for home-made cloud storage.

AWS Backup is a fully managed backup service that makes it easy to centralize and automate the back up of data across AWS services in the cloud as well as on premises using the AWS Storage Gateway. Using AWS Backup, you can centrally configure backup policies and monitor backup activity for AWS resources, such as Amazon EBS volumes, Amazon RDS databases, Amazon DynamoDB tables, Amazon EFS file systems, and AWS Storage Gateway volumes.
There are many other reasons to pay for cloud storage, from getting a lot more space (a terabyte really doesn't cost all that much anymore) to being able to upload really big files. That last benefit is relevant to graphic designers, video editors, and other visual artists who often host enormous files. Other perks of paying for your cloud storage often include increased access to file-version history (meaning you can restore an important business proposal to the version you had before your colleague made a bunch of erroneous changes), more security, or more features for collaboration and working with teams.
Storing your most sensitive files locally on a hard drive is still (and probably always will be) the logical thing to do. But it’s not always the most convenient, which is why most of us look to cloud storage as a secondary option. It has its own set of benefits: it’s reasonably affordable, it makes sharing files easier, it’s ubiquitous across most operating systems and devices, and it’s just really nice to have a backup when your hard drive dies.
For businesses looking for a hybrid solution, Egnyte offers enterprise-level storage and file sharing platform that lets businesses store their data locally and in the cloud. This system enables all types of data to be stored in the public cloud, while highly sensitive data benefits from the higher security and better reliability of on-premise servers. It accommodates for any device and allows you to collaborate anywhere.
Some cloud storage services offer pretty healthy free storage plans for individual users, which becomes a good way to start things off. Then there are others that offer superb deals of free storage bundled with devices from manufacturers like Apple and HP. The thumb rule is – cloud vendors don’t get hurt by giving away free storage, if it gets them new clients for premium services. Look for it and you shall find it.
With the maturing of the all-flash array (AFA) market, the established market leaders in this space are turning their attention to other ways to differentiate themselves from their competition besides just product functionality. Consciously designing and driving a better customer experience (CX) is a strategy being pursued by many of these vendors.This white paper defines cloud-based … Continue Reading...
Yes, Amazon has its own cloud storage solution, aptly named Amazon Drive. You can sign up for this with your existing Amazon account (who doesn't use Amazon these days?) and you'll get a 3-month trial. This should be more than enough time to determine if Amazon Drive is for you. After that trial is up, you have three options, and none of them are free, unfortunately.
Because all of the company’s services are integrated with Drive, they dip from the same 15GB pot you get with the free account. For us, that’s not enough; one of our testers had amassed almost 10GB just in archived emails in his personal account over the past five years, which would leave him with only 5GB of space for everything else. If he were a photo-fanatic, that wouldn’t be a whole lot of space.

Data lakes built on object storage keep information in its native form, and include rich metadata that allows selective extraction and use for analysis. Cloud-based data lakes can sit at the center of all kinds data warehousing, processing, big data and analytical engines, such as Amazon Redshift, Amazon RDS, Amazon EMR and Amazon DynamoDB to help you accomplish your next project in less time with more relevance.
There is also a feature that allows you to remotely access files on another PC via the OneDrive website. If privacy is a major concern then it should be noted that Microsoft reserve the right to scan your files to look for what it would deem objectionable content. This could be copyrighted material or things of an explicit nature. Apple has a similar policy, making the two potentially more intrusive than their competitors.
Yes, Amazon has its own cloud storage solution, aptly named Amazon Drive. You can sign up for this with your existing Amazon account (who doesn't use Amazon these days?) and you'll get a 3-month trial. This should be more than enough time to determine if Amazon Drive is for you. After that trial is up, you have three options, and none of them are free, unfortunately.
Dropbox gives its users plenty of opportunities to get extra storage to beef up the paltry 2GB you get when you sign up. If you participate in the quick Getting Started tutorial, you get 250MB. Turn on the automatic photo upload feature on any of the mobile apps to get 3GB of extra space (you can get only 3GB total, not per device). You can earn 500MB for each friend you refer to Dropbox who actually signs up for the service, up to 16GB total, or 32 referrals.
Users seek the easiest route to collaborate and complete their task.  Typically, within a functional department, business users are collaborating and storing or sharing information through emails, file transfer sites, Dropbox and USB drives. Much of this activity is ad hoc and done with tools that aren’t owned or managed by the enterprise. In many cases, consumer tools are used. The fact that this happens is not the problem though, at least not completely. People are essentially doing this for business purposes. Today employees are looking for easy and fast ways to share information and get the job done: USB devices, mobile devices, email, Dropbox and other online file transfer services. If you don’t provide an effective data management and collaboration environment within your organization, you’re at risk of employees connecting and sharing through unmanaged networks.  Even if you have a system in place, if it’s too cumbersome to use employees will work in parallel with the platform choosing the easiest route to collaborate.
You could also just pass files back and forth via a service like MASV, if you’re sending archives of drafts and finished work to one another. It’s less useful if each client just wants to have a folder they can reference that’s full of everything you’ve worked on together: old and new projects, invoices, artwork, documents, spreadsheets, et cetera. Similarly, there’s Hightail—also worth considering, with the same kind of limitations.
Now you can share a 200GB or 2TB iCloud storage plan with your entire family, giving everyone enough space to store photos, videos, and files without having to purchase separate plans. Family members won’t have access to each other’s files, but it’s easy to see how much storage everyone is using. If you need more space, you can upgrade to a larger plan at any time.
Mozy offers cloud backup, sync and mobile access for computers and servers for individuals, businesses and enterprise IT services. Mozy's sync services are simple because they keep every file updated throughout the day. Mozy features include automatic cloud backup, mobile access, military-grade security, data restore capabilities, server backups and data management.
Even with the free additional storage, Dropbox isn't cheap if you need a lot of storage. On the other hand, it continues to be my favorite because it integrates so easily with every computing device I use. In addition, even if I don't have an internet connection, I can use any files stored in it because by default, it syncs with all my local devices. If it were only cheaper, it would be perfect.
Whether you’re looking for a personal or business account, it’s in the best interest of any cloud storage service to offer a free version (hello, roping in new users), but it’s also a win for us consumers, especially when it comes to free encrypted cloud storage (hello, security). Many personal users won’t need the space provided in a premium plan, and plenty of services offer a free version that’ll more than satisfy — why pay when you don’t have to?
Common types of storage, transmission, and distribution include the use of distributed peer-to-peer networking, centralized servers on computer networks, online-based hyperlinked documents, and manual sharing of transportable media. In this article, we’ll take a look at the best file sharing software services to help you select the best system for your needs.
The availability, durability, and cost benefits of cloud storage can be very compelling to business owners, but traditional IT functional owners like storage, backup, networking, security, and compliance administrators may have concerns around the realities of transferring large amounts of data to the cloud. Cloud data migration services services such as AWS Import/Export Snowball can simplify migrating storage into the cloud by addressing high network costs, long transfer times, and security concerns.

If you’re comfortable dealing with a more manual approach, you can always pick up a great NAS box—a network-attached storage device—and use that to host your data. It shouldn’t be that tricky to set up user accounts for your clients and launch some kind of online portal they can use to view, send, and download files. (Or you can grant them access to a simple FTP server, if you want.) You could also setup your own dedicated server, but that’s a bit more complex than a NAS box.


Mega is the sequel to the now-defunct Megaupload, a cloud storage service that was taken down by the authorities a couple of years ago. Mega is an up-and-coming service that gives users 50GB for free. That's the largest sign-on bonus we've seen among all of these cloud storage apps and services. It comes with a range of storage options that span from 200GB to 8TB. The app is quite flashy but there are a few bugs here and there that some people have experienced. Its biggest feature is that it encrypts all files uploaded to it for added security and protection.

Just to clear up any confusion, the cloud part of cloud-based storage services refers to storing your files somewhere other than your computer's hard drive, usually on the provider's servers. As one tech pundit put it: "There is no Cloud. It's just someone else's computer." Having data in the cloud refers to the ability to access those files through the internet. Your data is usually encrypted before making the journey over the internet to the providers' servers, and, while it lives on those servers, it's also encrypted. Well-designed services don't upload entire files every time they change. They just upload the changes, saving your connection bandwidth.
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