Assuming you can convince your clients to adopt a new solution for file management—which might involve taking deliverables outside of their control (their cloud storage) and keeping it on a solution you set up—then I agree, it makes the most sense to consolidate everything you’re doing to a single service, rather than having to deal with a bunch of services simultaneously.

roles/storage.legacyBucketOwner The bucket finance-marketing IT staff Giving the IT staff the roles/storage.legacyBucketOwner role for the bucket allows them to perform common bucket management tasks, such as deleting objects and changing the IAM policy on the bucket. It also allows the IT staff to list the contents of the finance-marketing bucket, but not view or download any of the contents.
A client syncs (sends) copies of files over the Internet to the data server, which then saves the information. When the client wishes to retrieve the information, he or she accesses the data server through a web, desktop or mobile client. The server then either sends the files back to the client or allows the client to access and manipulate the files on the server itself.
IT can’t ignore Apple iCloud. This personal cloud storage service, which debuted in iOS 5 and will also have an expanded presence in Mac OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion, backs up media and documents that users download and create, which is great for personal use. Despite some enterprise IT fears about iCloud, there might be a silver lining: iTunes is the portal through which files get to iCloud, and since iTunes has to run on a computer, a system administrator can use system policies to restrict users’ access.

Dropbox was among the first services to offer seamless upload and storage via its client software (though Box beat Dropbox to market by two years). The service is enhanced with an impressive ecosystem of third-party apps that integrate with Dropbox, including Salesforce, DocuSign, Jira Software, Office 365 and Slack. And though Dropbox has primarily focused on consumers and SMBs, its recent IPO filing document states that the company has ambitions for the enterprise market (and already has some large business customers). Dropbox gets high marks for being easy to use, and its growing collaboration features, such as the new Showcase interface for sharing files with partners and clients, continue to improve. Its free plan only offers 2GB of storage, however – a pittance compared to Google Drive’s 15GB.
On the plus side of the ledger, SkyDrive, with 7GB of free storage, offers more free storage than many of the other services. If you want 20GB more, it will cost you $10 a year. 50GB is $25, and 100GB is just $50 annually. Price right SkyDrive is a bargain, but I'd be remiss if I didn't point out that Microsoft's business cloud service Azure just suffered a major cloud storage failure .
^ Kolodner, Elliot K.; Tal, Sivan; Kyriazis, Dimosthenis; Naor, Dalit; Allalouf, Miriam; Bonelli, Lucia; Brand, Per; Eckert, Albert; Elmroth, Erik; Gogouvitis, Spyridon V.; Harnik, Danny; Hernandez, Francisco; Jaeger, Michael C.; Bayuh Lakew, Ewnetu; Manuel Lopez, Jose; Lorenz, Mirko; Messina, Alberto; Shulman-Peleg, Alexandra; Talyansky, Roman; Voulodimos, Athanasios; Wolfsthal, Yaron (2011). "A Cloud Environment for Data-intensive Storage Services". 2011 IEEE Third International Conference on Cloud Computing Technology and Science. doi:10.1109/CloudCom.2011.55.
Dropbox is still a good choice thanks to the sheer number of platforms it supports. Tresorit and pCloud are two services that deserve a lot of attention. Security is a very important consideration these days and both of these  manage to provide encryption in a way that doesn’t interrupt a normal workflow and is easy to manage - especially in the paid versions. 
I.T. has no control over the performance or service up-time of these public cloud platforms. ‘Private clouds’ or server-based solutions that are deployed within a company’s firewall provide more favorable transfer speeds than the average broadband connection.  Transfer rates can be problematic and should be a consideration when handling large files. such as a large CAD assembly file.  Sufficient transfer rates will undoubtedly determine productivity.  There are concerns regarding where your data is stored and the risk of losing control over your data. Typically cloud storage platforms store all their users’ data at the same locations, within offshore data warehouses or 3rd party storage providers. This means that your data and the way it is handled is subject to local laws and most of the time we don’t even know the physical location of the data store.  If any of these third-party data storage companies would go bankrupt (as it happened with Nirvanix and Wuala) you would be left with very little time to save your data.
Those are a few of the options I can think of. Unfortunately, cloud storage can be pricey no matter how you go about it. And I find that cheaper solutions tend to create more headaches—or, worse, can be a lot slower than an established player like Google, or Dropbox, et cetera. Nevertheless, hopefully one of these works for you. Write back and let me know what you picked (or if you need a bit more guidance!)
Microsoft doesn’t offer encryption services for personal OneDrive accounts; business and SharePoint online are the company’s only encrypted online storage platforms. This means if you want to use your own personal account through Microsoft’s cloud and not have to deal with potentially compromised information, you might have to encrypt your own data to ensure your files are secure. In addition, the company’s history of battling “privacy concerns” goes hand-in-hand with its reputation for tracking users without transparent disclosure.
Signing up for an individual account at Box gives you 10GB of cloud storage, which is a good start. Similar to Dropbox, Box natively allows its users to create text documents that can be edited in real time with collaborators. This cloud storage service also offers the ability to edit text as well as other types of documents with Microsoft’s Office tools integration, which are like Google’s suite of productivity apps, but more akin to the legacy desktop apps that some are accustomed to using.

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ZumoDrive works with Windows, Mac, Linux, iPhone, Android, and Palm Pre and seems to be making a lot of people happy. Designed to give you access to all your files — music, documents, videos, photos, and more — wherever you are and no matter what device or platform you're using, ZumoDrive's tag line is "cloud storage that appears local." ZumoDrive gives you 1GB of free storage. You can also choose a for-fee subscription plan that works for you —ranging from 10GB for $2.99/month all the way up to 500GB for $79.99/month.
CrashPlan combines online storage with complete backup services. The service backs up changed information as often as every minute and continues to watch for changes to data in real time. After the first backup completes, CrashPlan checks for data that is already backed up and ignores it, making subsequent backups much smaller because they contain only new or changed information.
For some computer owners, finding enough storage space to hold all the data they've acquired is a real challenge. Some people invest in larger hard drives. Others prefer external storage devices like thumb drives or compact discs. Desperate computer owners might delete entire folders worth of old files in order to make space for new information. But some are choosing to rely on a growing trend: cloud storage.
Storing your files in the cloud has many advantages. You can view your files from any phone, tablet or computer that's connected to the Internet, and the cloud can also provide backup for files so they'll never disappear if your phone gets lost or your computer crashes. Using the cloud is a no-brainer, but picking which service to use is a bit more difficult.
Previously known as SkyDrive, OneDrive is Microsoft’s own combo of a cloud storage solution and an Office suite. If you’re primarily a Windows or Microsoft Office user, taking advantage of this cloud is almost effortless. OneDrive is deeply integrated with Windows 10 and Windows Phone and best serves those already invested in the ecosystem. However, outside the Windows system, it’s a bit more difficult to navigate. We also had to go through the verification process several times before it stuck on all the devices that we used throughout the week.

Cloud storage can provide the benefits of greater accessibility and reliability; rapid deployment; strong protection for data backup, archival and disaster recovery purposes; and lower overall storage costs as a result of not having to purchase, manage and maintain expensive hardware. There are many benefits to using cloud storage, however, cloud storage does have the potential for security and compliance concerns that are not associated with traditional storage systems.
Design-wise, the interface is clean, simple to understand, and when you finish the initial install the app immediately starts a backup of your system. We’d like to see the options of which folders you want in the cloud appearing first, but it’s an easy thing to quickly rectify. Still, presumptuous software is something that never finds us overjoyed.
Files stored on the cloud can usually be shared using a Public URL. Public URL's are a direct link to your file or folder. Usually the service provider will have a user interface that any user can access on their website. This allows recipients to easily access files you send them. With a link, you can post it any where making it extremely versatile. It's also easy to use and, since it's public, anyone can access it.
Security is obviously an important element in any online service. Knowhow encrypts data in transit using TLS to fend off any interceptions, and the Briefcase files are encrypted on the users machine as well. Files on the Knowhow servers are not stored in an encrypted form, but Knowhow assure us that they remain very secure behind several layers of protection and are unidentifiable to any snoopers.
Over the last decade, "the cloud" has become the latest business buzzword, sometimes to the point of confusion. Cloud storage, software, and computing might sound like jargon, but to businesses of all sizes, it's an important innovation that has led to increased data security, more reliable access to important files and a huge savings of time and money. What is cloud storage? Let's take a look.
In this scenario, a client wants to make specific files available to specific individuals through simple browser downloads. You can do this by using the Cloud Storage cookie-based authentication. To use the feature, you grant a user permission to access an object, and then you give the user a special URL to the object. When the user clicks the URL, Cloud Storage prompts them to sign in to their Google account (if they are not already logged in) and the object is downloaded to their computer. The following users will be able to download the object:

Features: Knowing what features your cloud storage service supports is essential in choosing the right one for you. A comparison of the top free cloud storage services can help you decide between a few of the better ones. Beyond that, do some research on the company's websites to see what they offer, like if they support streaming media files from their website or mobile app, if that's something you require.
In terms of sharing data, at a minimum, this should take the form of a sync client, meaning software that resides on each registered client and which takes care of making sure data in the cloud is synced with any local replicas. But it can also have other points of access. For instance, Microsoft OneDrive for Business syncs with the Team sites that are part of the popular Microsoft SharePoint collaboration platform, while Box for Business offers a fully functional web client with drag-and-drop support. Shared data can be stored in folders originated by individuals or in team folders that are created by team leads or administrators (and are accessible to anyone on the team). Some version of team folders should be considered a necessary component of any business-grade cloud storage app. By creating central points of collaboration that don't originate from any one user, it becomes easier to grant and revoke access as well as pass on ownership when an individual leaves the organization or changes divisions.

Tresorit is cloud storage for the very security conscious. Tresorit for Business provides encrypted storage on the cloud to protect confidential information. With interfaces for both desktop and mobile devices, the service protects information residing on devices with two levels of authentication. This ensures security for confidential information even if a password has been stolen. It allows document owners to track the activities of collaborators, and roll back changes by collaborators if required. The company offers two plans:
If you have a Google account, you also have 15GB of free cloud storage on Drive that never expires. What you choose to back up is obviously up to you, but Drive works particularly well with documents, allowing real-time collaboration and editing in plain text, spreadsheets, and presentations. Emails and other files received through Gmail will count against your storage, but keeping your inbox under control can keep more of the complimentary 15GB of storage open for use.
So after he "tried everything I could find, but each product inevitably suffered problems with internet latency, large files, bugs, or just made me think too much", he came up with the idea of the first popular cloud-based personal file storage service. In the six years since then, it seems like everyone is offering some kind of infrastructure as a service (IaaS) cloud storage.
You might also want to check out Dropbox’s offerings. For its cheapest business plan—$450 annually—you get up to three user accounts and 3TB of shared storage. You can reuse these user licenses as you see fit (as clients come and go), and you can grant your clients the ability to access shared folders and download anything in them. (And they can send new things your way via the File Request feature, or sign up for a free Dropbox account themselves, so long as they don’t blow past the 2GB free limit.)
For people who need big-business cloud storage on a small-business budget, Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3) offers advanced features with web-scale computing capabilities at an affordable price. Small businesses get access to the same cloud used by Amazon and its big-name customers, such as Netflix, Pinterest and NASDAQ – a highly scalable infrastructure that comes with the same security, reliability and speed that the company offers to its big customers. Businesses can store and distribute documents, media, applications and other types of files; implement backup, archiving and disaster-recovery systems; and host their website on Amazon's servers.

Oh hello, Amazon. As we’ve said, it’s still cheap, just not quite as cheap. You’ve got some key factors to consider outside of just price, though. First, are you an Amazon Prime member? If so, you’ve got unlimited photo storage at your disposal, so do that. Yes, even if you’re already storing them in Google Photos or iCloud or wherever. The more important question, though, might be how prepared you are to live with Amazon’s stripped down cloud interface. It’s fine, just basic, which for novice users may be handy but could frustrate people who like to fiddle.
The number of people with access to the data who could be compromised (e.g., bribed, or coerced) increases dramatically. A single company might have a small team of administrators, network engineers, and technicians, but a cloud storage company will have many customers and thousands of servers, therefore a much larger team of technical staff with physical and electronic access to almost all of the data at the entire facility or perhaps the entire company.[17] Decryption keys that are kept by the service user, as opposed to the service provider, limit the access to data by service provider employees. As for sharing multiple data in the cloud with multiple users, a large number of keys has to be distributed to users via secure channels for decryption, also it has to be securely stored and managed by the users in their devices. Storing these keys requires rather expensive secure storage. To overcome that, key-aggregate cryptosystem[18] can be used.
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